Meet the YI HALO, a 360° camera which records resolutions up to 8K x 8K with 17 individual cameras. YI Technology’s CEO Sean Da talks us through its features.

YI HALO

The YI HALO

8K x 8K. That’s already an amazing figure on its own, but there is more to this device than just a massive pixel count. In terms of design, the YI HALO works as the frame that holds seventeen 2.5K action cameras. 16 of them handle the horizontal view while one camera faces up, and they are all connected internally to the main unit that also powers them.

YI HALO

All parts can be accessed and replaced

This design makes the YI HALO completely modular. If something happens to one of the cameras, you can just replace it with one of the two spares it comes with, and you can even replace them with newer models once these become obsolete – something that doesn’t take very long in the camera world these days. Firmware upgrades are also easy to do: they can be triggered for all connected cameras through the interface on the main unit.

YI HALO

A sample image from YI’s website. For illustrative purposes only.

The downside of being so modular is that each of the cameras will need its own SD card. On the other hand, recording 17 streams of such high-res video to just one medium would require a much more sophisticated recording unit. The HALO can record 8K x 8K resolutions at up to 30p and 6K x 6K resolutions at up to 60 fps.

YI HALOThe unit is powered through a dedicated battery which lasts for about 100 minutes of continuous recording, although you can also use AC to both power and charge the internal battery at the same time. The whole unit weights about 7.7 lbs (3,5 kg).

Stitching Video

The YI HALO is the second 360° rig to be fuelled by Google’s Jump software, after the 16-camera GoPro Odyssey. This cooperation between YI and Google Jump is quite interesting: once you have offloaded all of your 17 SD cards, Google’s Jump software takes over stitching the actual 360° stereoscopic video. Users don’t need to rely on new software from a single manufacturer, but instead can count on a proven system developed by a global company. The Jump algorithms will handle the stitching job as a completely automatic process, which takes the pain out of manually stitching together 17 individual video streams.

Have a look at the official introduction video below (hint: it’s shot in 360° stereoscopic video):

There is also an app available from YI which helps you configure the HALO. Additonal modes such as photo or timelapse can also be found there.

Pricing and Availability

The YI HALO will be available in late summer 2017. Pricing hasn’t been announced yet, but don’t expect it to be cheap. The device will come bundled with a bunch of accessories, of which the two spare cameras are a particularly cool addition.

YI HALO

If you want to learn more about the YI HALO, head over to their website, full specifications can be found here.

Are you into 360 stereographic video? Tell us your story in the comments below!

The post The YI HALO Camera Rig Shoots 8K x 8K Stereoscopic Video appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DOlaf von Voss

Atomos just announced that the 4K 60fps Atomos Shogun Inferno is experiencing a large price drop of $500 ahead of NAB 2017 in Las Vegas. Final pricing and more information below: 

 

Catch the in-depth cinema5D review, written by Tim Fok, of the Atomos Shogun HERE.

Previously available for $1795, this monitor/recorder will soon be available from retailers like B&H for $1,295. This puts the SDI/HDMI 7″ high-brightness HDR monitor in a very competitive price category, especially given its long list of advanced features.

Technical Highlights: 

  • 4K 60fps
  • Weight: 12.55 lb
  • 2Kp240 ProRes
  • DNxHR recording over HDMI 2.0 or 3G QuadLink/6G/12G SDI
  • License-free 12-bit Raw from Sony FS5/FS7/FS7II/FS700, Canon C300MKII/C500 or Panasonic Varicam LT

Given the price drop, will the Atomos Shogun Inferno find its way into your kit? Comment below!

The post DEAL ALERT! $500 Off Atomos Shogun Inferno appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DGraham Sheldon

Yesterday DJI Introduced a new remote controller for their Inspire 2 and Matrice 200 drones – The DJI Cendence. They also announced a high-gain antenna called DJI Tracktenna and combined it all with their Crystalsky high bright display. I had a chance to take a closer and get some hands-on experience at the launch event and on the NAB show floor. Here’s why I think these new tools can make a huge difference for professional drone shooters.

When you have a drone as capable as the DJI Inspire 2 (Check out our extensive review here) then the one thing that can still ruin your shots is either the operator or the interface between the operator and the drone. Taken that the operator is a professional you want to make sure that the interface is flawless. With the new DJI Cendence remote, the DJI Crytalsky monitor and the DJI Tracktenna, drone shooters will soon have a new system that can help them monitor and control their drones in a better way.

DJI Cendence Drone Remote Controller

Focusing and gimbal control issues on the Inspire 2 are a thing of the past – The new DJI Cendence gives you increased efficiency and better controls over every aspect of your drone.

Trying the DJI Cendence Remote Controller at the launch event

At the launch event at Las Vegas Wynn I had a chance to take a closer look at the new DJI Cendence remote controller for the first time. At this time the device was turned off and only today, on the NAB show floor I could get a better hands-on experience.

DJI Cendence Remote Controller

The DJI Cendence features a vast amount of customizable buttons, dials and other controls. On display it was presented with a new DJI Crystalsky monitor, which gives you high brightness for better viewing outdoors. It connects through a cable-less interface at the top of the remote.

Besides offering cutsomizable buttons and dials all over the remote, users also have instant access to functions like ISO, sharpness, shutter speed, without having to navigate touch screen menus and. Important camera information can be seen on a separate small display.

There is also a dedicated wheel for accurate focus control. And if you’ve been using a DJI Inspire, then you know that controlling your focus via an analogue interface can make a huge difference. So far users had to purchase a separate focusing device that has to be operated by a second person, or alternatively they had to rely on the touch autofocus functionality which is not always reliable. The focus wheel on the DJI Cendence had a fast response time and I could easily focus like on an analogue lens.

The remote controller offers an SDI and HDMI port for live HD broadcast and streaming applications.

More good news is that this new controller is a little more modular than the original one. The Cendence remote controller’s antennas, PCB, mounting bracket, and battery are all detachable and therefore replacable.

Overall I found the DJI Cendence to be an essential tool for my drone work. It is a very welcome upgrade to the basic remote and gives me the controls I need to make some shots work that I couldn’t have gotten without it. Although I was not able to fly a drone with it yet, most of the controls concern the gimbal which I was able to test on the ground. Fruthermore the Crytalsky monitor that was displayed for the first time was extremely bright and its touch screen was very responsive. With up to 2000 cd/m2 it offers 4 times the brightness of an iPad.

The DJI Cendence will be available later this year and will cost $999.

CrystalSky is available for pre-order now in three configurations: a 5.5-inch, 1000 cd/m2 version for $469; a 7.85- inch, 1000 cd/m2 version for $699; and the 7.85-inch, 2000 cd/m2 version for $999 (LINK).

DJI Tracktenna

On the Inspire 2 you can quickly loose video transmission when you’ve set the feed to a high data rate. According to the specs the DJI Tracktenna seems to solve this problem. This high-gain antenna sports built-in sensors and a two-axis gimbal that automatically points the antenna at your drone at all times.

In optimal conditions, DJI Tracktenna in combination with the Cendence controller can boost signal transmission to over 6.2 miles (10 km). This calls for a word of warning: With technology able of pushing the limits of what’s possible this far, pilots should always understand and follow any applicable laws and regulations.

DJI Tracktenna supports transmission speeds of up to 10 Mbps within 1.24 miles (2 km) for data-intensive applications. It supports both 2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz frequency bands, giving it greater signal stability.

Pricing and availability for DJI Tracktenna will be announced at a later date.

The post DJI Cendence Hands-On – A Better Remote Controller with Focus Wheel for Inspire 2 & Matrice 200 appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DSebastian Wöber

Just minutes before the official opening of NAB 2017, Blackmagic Design unveiled DaVinci Resolve 14. It features a whole new audio tab, thanks to the company’s acquisition of Fairlight last year. There are also many other improvements throughout the application. Let’s dive in!

Blackmagic Design Resolve 14

Following version 12.5, version 14 of Resolve is almost ready to hit the grading suites. And the editing suites, of course. Oh wait, this version will even hit audio suites, too! After skipping version 13, version 14 is all about Pro Audio. Their acquisition of Fairlight last year left everyone wondering what Blackmagic Design’s secret masterplan was. Well, now you know: Resolve 14 has evolved in a way that allows you to stay in the same application for the edit, grade and audio mix stages of your project.

The Fairlight Audio Tab

You can create up to 1,000 tracks of audio and work with them in realtime, with 8 main, sub and aux outputs available. The Fairlight tab works in tandem with a whole new line of Fairlight hardware consoles that accelerate and streamline the whole audio workflow. There are 4 versions of these available: a desktop console, a two-bay console, a three-bay console and a gigantic 5-bay console.

Resolve 14

The gigantic full size 5-bay Fairlight console for DaVinci Resolve 14.

Feature-wise, the new Fairlight tab in Resove 14 is capable of all kinds of audio-related tools, such as equalization and dynamics, for example. It gives you real-time 6-band equalization, along with expander/gate, compressor and limiter dynamics on every single track. Editing and automation, mixing of course, mastering and VST plugins are all there at your service.

Resolve 14

In order to improve the performance of the Fairlight tab, you might want to add a dedicated Fairlight Audio Accelerator card to your system. It will provide you with sub-millisecond latency on all 1,000 tracks, along with full real-time processing of EQ, expander/gate, compressor and limiter dynamics, and up to 6 real-time VST plug-ins per channel. If you choose to not get one of those cards, you still can add up to 60 tracks of audio to your project.

Collaborative Working

Resolve 14 also features a whole new set of collaborative features. Multiple members of your team can work together on one project at the same time, and can compare different timeline versions.

The heart of all this is the new project manager software which handles traffic and saves the changes from each user automatically. Once the system is set up multiple users can log in and start working. In terms of storage, you are free to use whatever suits your needs best – there is no limitation to certain storage systems.

Resolve 14

The new collaboration tool within Resolve 14

Users can protect their work by locking a certain bin or timeline. In case another user needs access, there’s even a built-in chat system. That way, you don’t have to send emails back and forth with login details. The collaboration feature is bound to a single facility, though, and doesn’t work over the internet for now.

These collaborative tools are available in the studio version of Resolve, which is now available at a reduced price of $299. Blackmagic Design hopes to get more people using the studio version, and all the tools available there.

Overall Performance

The whole playback engine in DaVinci Resolve 14 has received an overhaul. It features CPU and GPU optimization, fast 16-bit float playback, lower latency, faster UI refresh and support for Apple Metal. With all this, it should be easy to handle even very complex projects with ease, as long as you own a powerful computer with fast GPUs, of course. It’s still a very complex program in terms of system load, but version 14 has been designed to be much more easy on the system overall.

All in all, Blackmagic Design claims that the performance is up to 10x faster. JKL playback and scrubbing through footage should be way smoother than before.

Other Enhancements

It’s now possible to edit in fullscreen mode, too. Also, there is a new face recognition tool within the color tab of the program. With it you can easily track faces and enhance certain features like the eyes or the skin idividually. On top of that a lots of improvements have been implemented throughout the program.

Resolve 14

Pricing and Availability

The new Resolve 14 will be available for Mac, Windows and Linux later this year, though there is already a public beta version available. The Studio version of this public beta is $299, while the regular version is free of charge. You can download the beta on the Blackmagic Design website.

 

The post DaVinci Resolve 14 Unveiled – Whole New Audio Tab, Collaborative Tools and More appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DOlaf von Voss

At an event ahead of NAB 2017 here in Las Vegas, ZEISS just unveiled a completely new line of cinema lenses – the ZEISS CP.3 and CP.3 XD. The XD line features a new type of metadata technology for cinema lenses.

Differences and improvements between CP.3 and CP.2 lines

As their name implies, the CP.3 line replaces the currently existing CP.2 line of ZEISS Compact Primes. Considering that they have sold over 30,000 of the CP.2 line, it’s quite a bold move for ZEISS to move on to enhance such a beloved product. Are they any better?


Like their predecessors, they cover full frame 35mm stills camera sensors, but the front diameter has shrunk from a rather hefty 114mm on the CP.2 to only 95mm. Focusing was massively improved, as the focus barrel now moves much more easily – this is really something that has been a challenge with the CP.2s, so the softer focus rotation on the CP.3s is very welcome. Most of the optical designs stayed the same, but some individual lenses like the 18mm CP.3 were entirely developed from scratch, and not surprisingly: the 18mm was probably the weakest of the original CP.2s – and when put against my favourite lens, the CP.2 15mm, it did not compare very well at all.

Ambient Lockit Pro for lens data recording

ZEISS eXtended Data

The XD version of the new lenses comes with a metadata output – which means that all kinds of data is being generated about the lens while shooting. It’s the first affordable metadata-serving cine lens based on an open protocol, and ZEISS have even added lens distortion and shading information.

The same way that photographers are already used to from Adobe Lightroom, filmmakers will now also be able to work with the distortion information from each lens, such as for example to “un-distort” any recorded image accurately in post. Because this metadata changes constantly depending on where the focus is or what aperture is set, this “eXtended Data” saves information for every frame of the recorded video. This means no time-intensive manual measuring of distortion or shading information is necessary anymore. Thanks to this, the ZEISS EXtended Data will shine particularly in post production-heavy projects with green screen shots and CGI.

Ambient have cooperated with ZEISS in developing a lens data recorder, the MasterLockit Plus, which can be connected with the lens in order to save all that metadata coming from the lens in case your camera does not support recording metadata.

Pricing and availability

The 10 new CP.3s will become available from June, with the XD versions available from the fall, though there is no exact word pricing just yet.

The post ZEISS CP.3 and CP.3 XD Cine Lenses Announced – Interview & Hands-On appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DNino Leitner

At an event ahead of NAB 2017 here in Las Vegas, ZEISS just unveiled a completely new line of cinema lenses – the ZEISS CP.3 and CP.3 XD. The XD line features a new type of metadata technology for cinema lenses.

Differences and improvements between CP.3 and CP.2 lines

As their name implies, the CP.3 line replaces the currently existing CP.2 line of ZEISS Compact Primes. Considering that they have sold over 30,000 of the CP.2 line, it’s quite a bold move for ZEISS to move on to enhance such a beloved product. Are they any better?


Like their predecessors, they cover full frame 35mm stills camera sensors, but the front diameter has shrunk from a rather hefty 114mm on the CP.2 to only 95mm. Focusing was massively improved, as the focus barrel now moves much more easily – this is really something that has been a challenge with the CP.2s, so the softer focus rotation on the CP.3s is very welcome. Most of the optical designs stayed the same, but some individual lenses like the 18mm CP.3 were entirely developed from scratch, and not surprisingly: the 18mm was probably the weakest of the original CP.2s – and when put against my favourite lens, the CP.2 15mm, it did not compare very well at all.

Ambient Lockit Pro for lens data recording

ZEISS eXtended Data

The XD version of the new lenses comes with a metadata output – which means that all kinds of data is being generated about the lens while shooting. It’s the first affordable metadata-serving cine lens based on an open protocol, and ZEISS have even added lens distortion and shading information.

The same way that photographers are already used to from Adobe Lightroom, filmmakers will now also be able to work with the distortion information from each lens, such as for example to “un-distort” any recorded image accurately in post. Because this metadata changes constantly depending on where the focus is or what aperture is set, this “eXtended Data” saves information for every frame of the recorded video. This means no time-intensive manual measuring of distortion or shading information is necessary anymore. Thanks to this, the ZEISS EXtended Data will shine particularly in post production-heavy projects with green screen shots and CGI.

Ambient have cooperated with ZEISS in developing a lens data recorder, the MasterLockit Plus, which can be connected with the lens in order to save all that metadata coming from the lens in case your camera does not support recording metadata.

Pricing and availability

The 10 new CP.3s will become available from June, with the XD versions available from the fall, though there is no exact word pricing just yet.

The post ZEISS CP.3 and CP.3 XD Cine Lenses Announced – Interview & Hands-On appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DNino Leitner

Here at NAB 2017, DJI has just done it again. They lifted the curtain (literally) and unveiled the all-new DJI Ronin 2 gimbal, which is clearly aimed towards pro users. Let’s break it down.

The DJI Ronin 2

This monster really does look like one serious movie-making machine. The DJI Ronin 2 sports five times the torque of the original Ronin gimbal and it’s built like a tank. The engineers really seem to have gone back to the drawing board and built this thing from scratch. DJI claims that a lot of valuable feedback from their customers also helped them in designing this piece of equipment.

DJI Ronin 2

The DJI Ronin is not exactly lightweight, but neither is its maximum payload of 30 lbs (13.6 kg). It isn’t really designed for handheld work, though it is possible of course depending on the extent of your biceps. You don’t need to exhaust the maximum payload, but for a tiny DSLR or mirrorless camera, a smaller rig might be the better solution.

The gimbal itself weighs 12 lbs (5.5 kg) with the handle bar and 9 lbs (4.2 kg) without it. For comparsion reasons: The weight of the original Ronin is 9.26lbs (4.2 kg), the Ronin M clocks in at 5.07lbs (2.3kg). Have a look at the Ronin 2 introduction video below:

With the help of its onboard GPS, the giant (and therefore powerful) encoded motors allow the Ronin 2 to travel at speeds of up to 75 mph without drifting away from its target. As you can see, this gimbal is clearly aimed towards the higher-end market.

New Design

The DJI Ronin 2 features a splash-proof enclosed motor design, which means you don’t have to fear every drop of water around you. And because all the cables are hidden inside the carbon fiber frame, broken connectors from dangling cables should be a thing of the past.

Ronin 2

The DJI Ronin 2 mounted on some kind of cool buggy.

A complete power distribution system with numerous connectors and outlets is integrated neatly into the frame. Dual batteries provide the system with power, but the feature that really stands out is the capability of hot swapping the battery without losing power. The whole system features four 14.4-volt (8 amps total) ports near the camera cage, two 12.6-volt (4 amps total) ports near the pan motor, and one P-Tap 12.6-volt (4 amps) outlet on the battery mount. If two batteries are mounted to the gimbal, the system is capable of providing up to 2.5 hours of runtime to power the gimbal and a RED Dragon camera, for example.

DJI Ronin 2

the DJI Ronin 2 in broad daylight at NAB 2017

The self-heating batteries for the Ronin 2 are the same ones as for the DJI Inspire 2 drone. That way, battery management becomes easier and cold temperatures down to -4° F (-20° C) shouldn’t be a problem. The battery system is fully detachable to provide a portable power supply for any 12-volt P-Tap powered camera or accessory.

It’s All About Being Modular

The Ronin 2 system is designed to be modular, which is why the gimbal integrates a detachable grip design. This makes it really easy to switch from handheld to steadicam, to jib, to ready rig, to car mount, to cable cam and back again. You get the picture, right? There’s also a special two-axis stabilization mode available for steadicam use. Also you can lock different axis in order to prevent damage while on the go.

DJI Ronin 2

The DJI ronin 2 mounted to a car.

Balancing a gimbal is always kind of dull, but is work that of course needs to be done. The DJI Ronin 2 helps you balance your rig faster with its fine-tuning knobs and an auto tune stability feature. Because of the really high-torque motors, the rig will even forgive minor misalignments.

An integrated touch screen lets operators configure the gimbal settings for quick adjustments and for full control of mounted RED cameras. Fold-away feet are built into the rig, so there is no more need for a dedicated stand while in handheld mode.

DJI Ronin 2

the new romote control for DJI Ronin 2

There’s also a new remote available for the Ronin 2. With it it becomes possible to control it from nearly a mile away over dual band 2.8/5.8GHz. Could be nice for dual-operator type of shoots.

Intelligent Features

Lastly, there is an updated version of the DJI gimbal assistant mobile app. With it, you can let the Ronin 2 do the hard work so you can concentrate on your shot. Three modes are available:

DJI Ronin 2

Panorama mode: This will automatically control Ronin 2 to create still image panoramas. It is intelligent enough to include things like camera sensor type and a lens’ focal length into its calculations.  You also can define a custom overlap rate.

Timelapse mode: You can program movements and view the progress in real time.

CamAnchor mode: Record the gimbal’s orientation at any particular location, and revisit them at the touch of a button.

While the DJI Ronin 2 is an impressive evolution in gimbal technology, one thing that strikes us though is the close resemblance to the new M?Vi Pro that was announced half a year ago. It has the same circular cage design, cable-less structure and dual battery technology among other things.

Pricing and Availability

The DJI Ronin 2 will be available in the second quarter of 2017, and pricing will be announced accordingly. Learn more at DJI.com.

Does the Ronin 2 sound like a likely candidate for your next gimbal? Let us know in the comments!

The post DJI Ronin 2 – Cutting-Edge Gimbal Tech for Pros appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DOlaf von Voss

I think this new Panasonic Lens will replace my favorite Panasonic 7-14mm F/4 when flying my new GH5 on a Gimbal. The new lens is faster at F/2.8 at it's widest, adds a bit more reach, but most importantly offers filter threads for ND filters. It's not often you'll find a wide angle lens that accepts ND Filters. I don't mind that it's not as wide, as the new Panasonic GH5 camera can operate in 4K Video Mode without adding additional crop (as the GH4 used to). The new Panasonic 8-18mm lens is also dust and splash proof as well.

Panasonic 8-18mm Lenspanasonic wide zoom 8-18mm
Learn-More-sm Panasonic 8-18mm F/2.8-4 Wide Angle Zoom Lens

All credit is given to author CheesyCamCheesycam

The first of the two promised updates for the Panasonic GH5 has finally arrived. Firmware v1.1 enables internal 10-bit full HD 4:2:2 recording at 100Mbps. Later this year, the second update will unleash 4K 4:2:2 10-bit all-i internal recording. Worth a look, I would say!

Panasonic GH5Panasonic GH5 Firmware v1.1

The Panasonic GH5 is a very impressive piece of technology, no doubt about it, and you can read all about it in our early hands-on article about it here.

What’s even more impressive, however, is Panasonic’s commitment to releasing several updates for it over the course of 2017, meant not only to squash any potential bugs but also to implement various advanced features. The first of the two promised updates is now out, and it improves the internal recording capabilities by unlocking 10-bit full HD 4:2:2 internal recording. Until now, the Panasonic GH5 was only capable of recording Full HD 8-bit 4:2:0 at 100Mbps, so version 1.1 will really up the game in terms of Full HD resolution.

There are some good news for anamorphic shooters, too: the update brings 10-bit 4:2:2 IPB recording to a larger 3328 x 2496 region of the sensor, and is encoded at 150Mbps.

Firmware improvement content (taken from Panasonic’s official download link):

  • FHD 4:2:2 10-bit video recording has been added. It can be selected in either FHD [MP4 (LPCM)] or [MOV] recording format.
  • 4:2:2 10-bit video recording has been added to Anamorphic (4:3) mode.
  • There was a problem in which the exposure adjustment did not operate properly during live view standby when the [SS/Gain Operation] display was set to [ANGLE/ISO] while [Variable Frame Rate] was selected for Creative Video mode. This has been fixed.
  • A problem in [V-LogL] of Photo Style mode where afterimages appeared when recording video under high ISO sensitivity settings has been fixed.

Future Firmware Updates

This is only the first firmware update for the GH5, with more to follow. Later this year, Panasonic will release an update that focuses on the camera’s 4K recording capabilities.

Panasonic GH5

The current 4K 4:2:2 10-bit at 150Mbps will be replaced with some more muscle power, namely 400Mbps all-i. The Full HD will also get an update, unlocking 200Mbps all-i. You can wave goodbye to longGOP compression once the update is ready later this year. Very impressive for a camera this small and lightweight!

Conclusion

I think this update strategy for the Panasonic GH5 can be very reassuring for customers as it gives a little more peace of mind when making a purchase decision. The current HD implementation may not super high-end, but once it’s updated to 10-bit, this camera really should become the benchmark for other manufacturers in this market. So long, 8-bit!

Get this new update by heading over to Panasonic and clicking here. Additional beneficial information about this latest update can be viewed by clicking here

Have you invested in a Panasonic GH5? What are your thoughts about this update, and the next one coming later this year? Tell us in the comments below!

The post Firmware v1.1 for Panasonic GH5 Enables 10-Bit 4:2:2 FullHD Video appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DOlaf von Voss

The first of the two promised updates for the Panasonic GH5 has finally arrived. Firmware v1.1 enables internal 10-bit full HD 4:2:2 recording at 100Mbps. Later this year, the second update will unleash 4K 4:2:2 10-bit all-i internal recording. Worth a look, I would say!

Panasonic GH5Panasonic GH5 Firmware v1.1

The Panasonic GH5 is a very impressive piece of technology, no doubt about it, and you can read all about it in our early hands-on article about it here.

What’s even more impressive, however, is Panasonic’s commitment to releasing several updates for it over the course of 2017, meant not only to squash any potential bugs but also to implement various advanced features. The first of the two promised updates is now out, and it improves the internal recording capabilities by unlocking 10-bit full HD 4:2:2 internal recording. Until now, the Panasonic GH5 was only capable of recording Full HD 8-bit 4:2:0 at 100Mbps, so version 1.1 will really up the game in terms of Full HD resolution.

There are some good news for anamorphic shooters, too: the update brings 10-bit 4:2:2 IPB recording to a larger 3328 x 2496 region of the sensor, and is encoded at 150Mbps.

Firmware improvement content (taken from Panasonic’s official download link):

  • FHD 4:2:2 10-bit video recording has been added. It can be selected in either FHD [MP4 (LPCM)] or [MOV] recording format.
  • 4:2:2 10-bit video recording has been added to Anamorphic (4:3) mode.
  • There was a problem in which the exposure adjustment did not operate properly during live view standby when the [SS/Gain Operation] display was set to [ANGLE/ISO] while [Variable Frame Rate] was selected for Creative Video mode. This has been fixed.
  • A problem in [V-LogL] of Photo Style mode where afterimages appeared when recording video under high ISO sensitivity settings has been fixed.

Future Firmware Updates

This is only the first firmware update for the GH5, with more to follow. Later this year, Panasonic will release an update that focuses on the camera’s 4K recording capabilities.

Panasonic GH5

The current 4K 4:2:2 10-bit at 150Mbps will be replaced with some more muscle power, namely 400Mbps all-i. The Full HD will also get an update, unlocking 200Mbps all-i. You can wave goodbye to longGOP compression once the update is ready later this year. Very impressive for a camera this small and lightweight!

Conclusion

I think this update strategy for the Panasonic GH5 can be very reassuring for customers as it gives a little more peace of mind when making a purchase decision. The current HD implementation may not super high-end, but once it’s updated to 10-bit, this camera really should become the benchmark for other manufacturers in this market. So long, 8-bit!

Get this new update by heading over to Panasonic and clicking here. Additional beneficial information about this latest update can be viewed by clicking here

Have you invested in a Panasonic GH5? What are your thoughts about this update, and the next one coming later this year? Tell us in the comments below!

The post Firmware v1.1 for Panasonic GH5 Enables 10-Bit 4:2:2 FullHD Video appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DOlaf von Voss