Here is the lens test we did for the new Veydra Mini Primes. We only had the 16mm, 25mm, 35mm and 50mm all T2.2. The 12mm will jump out next year. We shot all of this with a Panasonic GH4 at 4K. We put these puppies up against some really killer glass and it performed quite well. It was nice to have a proper metal manual focus and iris lens for a change. The Veydra Mini Primes felt like a reduced size Zeiss Super Speed. Robust feel with solid gearing throughout.

The color was also outstanding. All lenses matched perfectly throughout the set. Flare control was also great as you can see in the video. A nice smooth Bokeh all around. It was nice to be a able to repeat focus off the lens and not a monitor. Plenty of room on the barrel for smooth focus pulls. Not this 1/4″ stuff you get from an AF lens.

We tried to treat this like an old school feature check out. Color charts, focus charts some bulb tests and a quick outside shot at dusk. We hope this helps you get a better feel for this glass. We really enjoyed using it and can highly recommend it for cinema work with MFT cameras. A set of four primes will set you back around $2500. A single lens will run you about $700.

Here is a link to the Kickstarter page.

Click here for more info.

What is Veydra?

Veydra is a premium cinema lens made specifically for filmmakers using Micro 4/3 cameras.  

Veydra Mini Prime lenses all feature 

  • Resolution that exceeds 4K
  • Cinema 0.8 module focus and iris gears
  • Consistent front 80mm outside diameter & 77mm filter threading
  • Similar length for quick lens changes
  • Constant T2.2 aperture for easy lighting set ups
  • Plated brass mounts for durability.

 

All credit is given to author Wide Open CameraJared Abrams

Here is the lens test we did for the new Veydra Mini Primes. We only had the 16mm, 25mm, 35mm and 50mm all T2.2. The 12mm will jump out next year. We shot all of this with a Panasonic GH4 at 4K. We put these puppies up against some really killer glass and it performed quite well. It was nice to have a proper metal manual focus and iris lens for a change. The Veydra Mini Primes felt like a reduced size Zeiss Super Speed. Robust feel with solid gearing throughout.

The color was also outstanding. All lenses matched perfectly throughout the set. Flare control was also great as you can see in the video. A nice smooth Bokeh all around. It was nice to be a able to repeat focus off the lens and not a monitor. Plenty of room on the barrel for smooth focus pulls. Not this 1/4″ stuff you get from an AF lens.

We tried to treat this like an old school feature check out. Color charts, focus charts some bulb tests and a quick outside shot at dusk. We hope this helps you get a better feel for this glass. We really enjoyed using it and can highly recommend it for cinema work with MFT cameras. A set of four primes will set you back around $2500. A single lens will run you about $700.

Here is a link to the Kickstarter page.

Click here for more info.

What is Veydra?

Veydra is a premium cinema lens made specifically for filmmakers using Micro 4/3 cameras.  

Veydra Mini Prime lenses all feature 

  • Resolution that exceeds 4K
  • Cinema 0.8 module focus and iris gears
  • Consistent front 80mm outside diameter & 77mm filter threading
  • Similar length for quick lens changes
  • Constant T2.2 aperture for easy lighting set ups
  • Plated brass mounts for durability.

 

All credit is given to author Wide Open CameraJared Abrams

We already reported about it in a recent news post (click here) – Tentacle Sync is a small black box (about the size and shape of a LP-E6 Canon battery which you might be familiar with from the 5D and 7D) which attaches to your camera and audio recorder and generates timecode. 

Now the guys behind the Indiegogo campaign and the product itself gave us a chance to use their prototypes and take them for a spin on a shoot. And I have to say, I’m thoroughly impressed.

IMG 5529 640x597 Tentacle Sync Timecode Generator   perfect in camera audio synchronization   Quick review

Syncing video and audio has been an important issue for mid-range to semi-pro shooters ever since DSLRs became commonplace, due to their lack to professional audio inputs. We started recording sound on external audio recorders, but that brought the problem of syncing audio in post with it. A brilliant software called Pluraleyes (now owned and developed by Red Giant, the makers of the legendary Magic Bullet Suite) made our lives much easier by analyzing and comparing waveforms, and thereby syncing the audio tracks easily and in a very straightforward way, ready to be edited in the NLE system of your choice.

However, of course Pluraleyes has its limit. Sometimes the camera is so far away from the action that its internal microphone doesn’t pick up what the audio recorder is picking up (and actually isn’t supposed to), which means there is no corresponding audio track to sync. The same is true for multi-camera shoots at events. It happened to me before that Pluraleyes thought it had recognized similarities and synced tracks up, but in reality it’s completely off because it might have used the wrong refrain of a music track played in the background as a reference. You can’t blame it really, it’s still an amazing piece of software that makes our lives so much easier, but it clearly has its limits.

If you work in traditional broadcast TV environments from time to time like I do, you might be familiar with Ambient Recording’s LockIt devices, which are made for larger broadcast cameras, feeding a timecode signal into the cameras which is in sync with the one generated for the external audio recorder. So it’s almost the same thing for a much higher price and with a considerably larger footprint similiar to a pack of cigarettes – so hardly feasible for everyday indie productions. Several times before I had issues attaching a LockIt to my C300, ending up with velcro-ing it onto the top grip, which is far from ideal and limits how I can use the camera.

 

Test set-up

The Tentacles are tiny – so tiny in fact that you can attach them even to small cameras like the A7s easily. And that’s exactly what I ended up doing. When testing, I gave it a quick go with an audio recorder, connecting one of the Tentacles with the supplied mini jack to XLR cable, while the other XLR track of my Tascam DR-100 recorded from an external Røde NTG-3 microphone. Before that, you have to do a quick and easy sync run between the Tenticles by connecting them to each other with the supplied cable, pressing the one button until the green lights flash in unison. Very easy and straightforward.

Trying to mimic a typical production, I let the audio track run through for about 30 minutes, while I collected a lot of different shots with the Sony A7s, which had the other Tentacle attached to it simply via a mini jack cable into the microphone input port.

This is a very realistic scenario and exactly where I had problems with Pluraleyes before: a multi-cam event shoot with an audio recorder at a central position, recording a wild track of the event on one channel, and possibly the audio from the stage on on two other channels – maybe one camera in a fixed wide position filming the stage, while I’m on the other, smaller camera, catching close-ups from the stage performance as well as quick reaction shots from the audience.

Screen Shot 2014 11 23 at 16.59.57 640x354 Tentacle Sync Timecode Generator   perfect in camera audio synchronization   Quick review

When I mimicked this scenario, the Tentacles worked great – I used their supplied software to sync up audio with the image, and then getting an XML that can be imported into Final Cut Pro X. Alternatively you can also export the clips with attached audio tracks, which makes you entirely independent of what editing system you use – or, say, to hand off footage files to another person to edit, without giving them the hassle of syncing.

Now it should be added that the SMPTE timecode signal embedded into the audio track which is generated by the Tentacles is industry standard – that means you don’t have to use their software – it’s totally optional. You can still sync timecodes in the editing application.

For peace of mind, the Tentacles also have a reference mic build in. I guess that’s really just for extreme emergencies though, because I can’t really think of many occasions where you might need it when you have proper timecode – only if another Tentacle fails to work, I guess, you can still sync via Pluraleyes with the reference sound.

IMG 5533 640x668 Tentacle Sync Timecode Generator   perfect in camera audio synchronization   Quick review

Conclusion

There’s not much more to say about the Tentacles than they just work. The guys behind these devices show a rare ability to think of easy solutions that work well both in hardware and their software – probably because they all come from video production as well. I’m looking forward for their software to support even more codecs and multicam exports better, but it’s already very well matured. It’s definitely very close to market, something you can’t say about most crowd funding campaigns for hardware …

I can recommend Tentacle Sync to anyone who regularly records image and sound separately on set. It’s just a no-brainer with these boxes, without the need for clapperboards and a lot of hassle in post production.

Last but not least, it’s predominantly sound people who know the matter best – of course, it’s their business. The guys behind soundrolling.com interviewed Max and Ulrich from Tentacle Sync extensively, asking all the right questions about the product – check out the recording of the YouTube Q&A by clicking here (unfortunately it can’t be embedded).

You can preorder Tentacle Sync on Indiegogo now.

Hands On Tentacle Sync – Hardware – Part 1/2 from Tentacle Sync on Vimeo.

Hands On Tentacle Sync – Software – Part 2/2 from Tentacle Sync on Vimeo.

The post Tentacle Sync Timecode Generator – perfect in-camera audio synchronization – Quick review appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author cinema5D » NewsNino Leitner

I still love the look coming out of the BlackMagic Design Pocket Cinema Cameras, but I’ll admit that i’m pretty lazy to take the cameras out as much as I could. The batteries have incredibly short run times, the large camera files eat through SDXC cards, the tiny low resolution makes it hard to set focus and practically disappears under bright lights.

For me to solve this, I use an external battery, Atomos Ninja HDMI Recorder, and a better EVF screen. This adds up to a lot of parts that I still need to find a way to mount as ergonomically as possible. Throwing a few pieces together, here’s what I ended up with.

Blackmagic pocket cinema camera small rig tilta cage spectrahd evf

Even though the system was relatively small, it was still somewhat awkward. After shooting for a full day, I realized the style of shooting on one particular project did not require the camera operator to move around within a few feet. So I decided a better way would be to split up the equipment, which makes the camera setup smaller, and now offers the benefit of a remote Director’s monitor. Here’s a video look on my new setup.

blackmagic pocket cinema camera rig

For the camera i’m using a Tilta BMPCC Cage with a Top Handle, mounted on PVGear.com 8″ 15mm Carbon Fiber Rails with some short handles.

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find-price-button PVGear.com 15mm Carbon Fiber Rails


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find-price-button Tilta BlackMagic Pocket Cinema Camera BMPCC Cage

For better focus and viewing, we’re using the new F&V SpectraHD EVF Monitor mounted to an adjustable EVF Mounting Bracket.

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find-price-button SpectraHD 4 Monitor EVF

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find-price-button SmallRig EVF Holder

The shoulder pad is the flexible PNCGear.com Hybrid Pad which can be folded up to use against the chest, or folded down to use over the shoulder.

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find-price-button PNCGear Hybrid folding Shoulder Chest Pad 15mm Clamp

I’m using the HDMI output from the F&V SpectraHD EVF with a 6 foot HDMI cable over to the Atomos Ninja2 Recorder. This now serves both as a directors monitor and an external recorder which is both cheaper and larger than any SD Cards I can afford.

With the Atomos mounted in a CMR Monitor Yoke, I have room to add a 14V Sony BPU battery to power up the BMPCC for hours and hours.

Sony BMCC BP-U30 BP-U60 battery adapter wall charger BlackMagic CInema CameraBlackMagic Cinema Camera 14V Battery Sony BP-U60 adapter
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find-price-button Atomos Ninja2 HDMI Recorder

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find-price-button Camera Motion Research Monitor Yoke

I find this setup to be perfect for the type of shooting I do with this camera, but still easy enough to disconnect if I want to run the BMPCC on it’s internal battery and record to internal SDXC cards.

So while a dual operator setup may not be ideal for live events where you are constantly on the move, this setup can be beneficial when you have time to plan your shots with a crew. It keeps the camera rig small so that it can easily go from handheld, to slider, to tripod, etc. It allows you to work in very confined spaces and fairly ergonomic to switch between low angles or off the shoulder. It may also be easier to pack up your gear into two separate cases without having to break anything down.

Hopefully this may inspire some of you guys to rethink your rigs as well. Remember that this is not limited to the BMPCC. The GH4 can output 4K 10bit from HDMI, Sony A7s requires an external HDMI Recorder for 4K, and even cameras like the Canon 5D Mark III can benefit using recorders that capture to ProRes HQ. Instead of throwing everything on one rig which can quickly get heavy, oversized, and akward to work with, it may be easier to split up your HDMI recorders, power solutions, second display, and even Audio Recorders off camera.

All credit is given to author CheesyCamEmm

Click here to view the embedded video.

The FZ1000 is $897.99 – view full specs and details at B&H Photo Video here

The Panasonic FZ1000 is a bridge camera, but is it a bridge that actually leads anywhere? Read my FZ1000 review to find out…

Bridge cameras tend to be a little slow, which defeats the purpose of having a versatile super-zoom at your disposal. I loved what I was able to capture so effortlessly with the Sony RX10 but even that was too slow and clunky at times. Even high end bridge cameras have all tended to lack the faster processors and more advanced features found in higher end cameras, so it’s a genuine surprise to see how responsive the FZ1000 is.

I hesitated to review the FZ1000 at all. It meant buying a camera I might not need, because I have a GH4. Why not just put a 14-140mm on the GH4?

In 4K video mode on the GH4 that lens is equivalent to 32-322. The FZ1000’s zoom is considerably longer though, 35-592mm in 4K mode, 25-400mm for 1080p and stills. Shame you lose that 25mm wide end in 4K mode, where you’re shooting not on a 2.7x crop 1″ sensor but an even smaller 3.8x crop.

fz1000-gh4

The FZ1000 has other issues too. Build quality feels cheap compared to the Sony RX10, though the lens fairs better the body is very much a plastic fantastic.

The viewfinder though is better than the RX10 and it has 4K video as well as very effective-slow mo in 1080p at 120fps, where image quality is actually surprisingly good at the high frame rate.

The FZ1000 ends up being an almighty time saver and shot grabber. It’s able to do a one-shot AF lock-on so well at the start of a recording that it gets moments other cameras will miss. All the time we spend checking manual focus on a DSLR, racking focus, changing lenses, using bulky zooms, even bringing two zooms along for the ride only to find none of them focus closely enough at the long end, all that time wasted and you realise how much quicker the FZ1000 is able to get a similar shot. The moment you spot a moment you can capture it.

4K also means more freedom in post to further recompose your image, as if the compositional abilities of that massive zoom range wasn’t already enough. For stills it is even better because 4K frames are print quality and in that sense you are shooting stills at 25fps or 30fps continuous. Spatial resolution, as in time capture increases 5 fold over a typical DSLR burst mode and it can go on doing this for 30 minutes at a time.

Now within your own directorial control, on a set or in a studio you don’t need to operate this fast or zoom so far – just sometimes – but out on the streets you do, all the time. Moments come and go in the blink of an eye. If you’re slow then you’re relying on serendipity to get any good shots at all. Any news shooter or documentary filmmaker will tell you that speed is absolutely vital.

Performance and features

When the FZ1000 was released it lacked 24p in 4K mode. Now that’s been added along with different aspect ratios in 4K Photo Mode like on the GH4.

Although the FZ1000 is not entirely free of feature culling via firmware to position it as a lower end camera than the GH4 it is actually surprisingly intact given the much lower price.

Three more things stand out aside from the lens and 4K codec at 100Mbit/s just like the GH4.

  • 5 axis stabilisation (and it works pretty well)
  • 120fps 1080p slow-mo (100fps on the PAL version)
  • 1080p at 60p and 24p
  • EVF and fully articulated LCD

What’s not so useful?

  • Tiny GH2 battery
  • In 120fps mode stabilisation doesn’t work
  • SD card slot under the body rather than on the side
  • Still some micro-jitter with the stabilisation at such long focal lengths

Given the excellent battery life on Panasonic’s recent cameras like the GH4 and LX100, it’s a shame this camera does not use the GH4’s larger battery (after all the body is the same size) or ramp the build quality up to at least Sony RX10 level.

The camera is superbly light given the massive zoom lens it features, which makes for some very easy rigging…

FZ1000 - Bunny Suit

FZ100

4K is more than resolution

In extolling the virtues of the FZ1000 as an affordable 4K camera I’ve had a few people tweet “4K, so what, it isn’t all about resolution”. I agree entirely, it isn’t all about resolution but they are completely wrong in thinking 4K itself is only about resolution! I am constantly hearing that it isn’t all about sharpness. What I equate 4K with in my head is something very different to just ‘sharpnesss’. It offers a dramatic widening of the data path between the sensor and your final image that carries every single thing that describes that image – dynamic range, colour, tonality, signal to noise ratio, resolution – the whole kitchen sink. Quality leaps up.

With no binning, averaging or line skipping and instead reading out 4 times the information that describes the image, you are naturally going to end up with a more life-like image closer to what the sensor sees in the first place. Be it for 4K or 1080p delivery, both benefit.

Dynamic range increases, the files feel chunkier to grade. Colour is richer, less thin and skin tones less plastic. And yeah, detail increases but it also looks far cleaner, with virtually no false detail, moire or aliasing in the final result especially if downscaling to 1080p in post. So to see 4K with all these advantages appear for under $1000 for the first time on the LX100 and FZ1000 is wonderful news for the consumer.

The 4K 100Mbit/s codec on the FZ1000 appears to be every bit as good as it is on the GH4 and it is double the bitrate of Sony’s XAVC-S implementation of 4K on the AX100. It’s also less than half the price of the AX100, more responsive, smaller and better ergonomically for both video and stills. It likely shares the same sensor too.

I’d choose it in a heartbeat over the Handycam and that’s not to say Sony are doing a bad job, it’s just that one particular products that failed to impress me. Anyone who wanted an AX100 but held off, should definitely now consider the FZ1000 if they haven’t gone for an interchangeable lens camera. For rolling shutter, dynamic range, low light – all the technical tests, these are coming in a separate article but the sample video above gives you an idea of what to expect for the first two.

FZ1000 still

Stills

The sensor in the FZ1000 is a known quantity for stills, being very similar the Sony RX100 series of 1″ 20MP chips. It is DSLR quality by ‘compact camera’ standards but with Panasonic themselves having redefined what compact quality means with the LX100, the FZ1000 is left trailing in terms of sensor size and low light performance to a compact now.

The Canon GX7 has a similar sensor and so does the Sony RX10, but the FZ1000 has faster AF than both of them and a much more interesting lens (not that the RX10’s lens was in any way not interesting!)

DSLR quality also involves a degree of being able to separate your subject from the background even if the shot you’re pulling off is not a close-up. Are we talking RX100 III style problems here where you can’t get any separation of the subject and the background unless you are stood within a few centimetres of them? No, because the lens is a 9-146mm. On the RX100 III it is approximately 9-25mm. A huge difference. At the longer end of this reach on the FZ1000 you get an extremely shallow depth of field. Indeed even at 50mm, compared to 25mm you will get a much shallower depth of field and be able to punch in on your subject.

EVF

The EVF is good by any standards in this class of camera. It is far better than the RX10. It is right up there with the GH4 though the glass does have more edge smearing going on when you move your eye about the eyecup.

The panel seems newer in the FZ1000 with great contrast and colour, a smidgen brighter looking than my GH4.

I’m spoilt for EVFs now I have the Fuji X-T1 though, which makes the EVF on every other camera even the Sony A7S feel a bit pokey.

Left: FZ1000. Right: GH4

Left: FZ1000. Right: GH4

Slow-mo

Slow-mo is definitely superior on this camera to 120fps on the Sony RX10.

In the menus it is dubbed High Speed Video, on / off. We have full 1080p at 120fps or 100fps depending on your region. The camera isn’t PAL / NTSC switchable unfortunately and you don’t have the same variety of variable frame rate options you get on the GH4. Combined with the rest of the features on the camera though, such as the 25-400mm lens, 120fps is a really special creative tool and produces results that are overall unique at $899. The quality is better than I expected, though the typical line-skipping is active as it is for similar slow-mo on the GH4 and A7S, meaning the HFR image isn’t free of moire or aliasing.

It looks at its best further away from the wide end of the lens and pointed at a human subject. The image is quite noisy in this mode so it isn’t a low-light slow-mo camera. The other issue is that stabilisation switches off, again a common thing with slow-mo modes on stills camera and I don’t know why. Stabilisation isn’t as critical for high speed video because when camera shake is slowed down so much it looks more like a gradual sway, but you still get some sway and OIS in this mode would have produced completely locked down shots. What a shame.

1080p

I don’t use 1080/24p or 60p in-camera on the FZ1000 because the 4K image is just way better. Also 1080p is AVCHD for the most part at low bitrates. 28Mbit/s for 1080/60p and 24Mbit/s for 30/24p. No 50Mbit/s or ALL-I like on the GH4. Switching to the MP4 codec eliminates AVCHD for 30/25/24p but introduces a drop to just 20Mbit/s, including for slow-mo mode. In 1080/60p it remains at 28Mbit/s. MP4 for 1080p is treated like a low quality option to make AVCHD, a Panasonic standard, look better. It is time AVCHD just died. Tell you what else’s odd…The Sony RX10 post firmware update does 1080p at double the bitrate of the FZ1000, but alas has no 4K. The Sony AX100 does 4K at half the bitrate of the FZ1000, alas the FZ1000 does 1080p at half the bitrate of the RX10! The whole situation is daft.

I don’t think many customers who buy the FZ1000 will miss an ALL-I codec but they might be pained to see AVCHD 1080p on there rather than the Quicktime MOV or MP4 wrapper. Playing and navigating the AVCHD folder is still a usability fail for Mac users, partly because of such poor Quicktime support for it still after all these years.

fz1000-4k-menu

Picture Profiles

The FZ1000 has all the picture profiles the GH4 does including CineLikeD but it doesn’t have a few of the deeper fine tuning options in the menus like master pedestal.

I thought for a second Panasonic might have removed this because the average consumer doesn’t know what it is. But they left in the RGB luminance levels option, 0-255 / 16-255!

Ergonomics

Sometimes picking up the FZ1000 it is easy to mistake it for a GH4. It’s good to see that like Canon, Panasonic have settled on pretty much one set of ergonomics for their stills cameras. Well, at least three of them! GH3 and GH4 users will be right at home with it, as will GH2 and G6 owners in many ways. Some nice touches for a camera in this price range… although overall build quality isn’t one. It has a mic socket and you can also control audio manually in-camera, same as the GH4. I count this as a small miracle.

It has two function buttons on the top near the mode dial, GH4 only has one. It has the same handy dial on the top left as the GH4 for shooting rate and timer. The same rear lever for focus mode. The same Fn5 button which also toggles between the EVF / LCD manually, Fn3 / Q-menu is present and correct. The playback button is better placed, accessible one handed on the right near all the other buttons rather than stuck out on the far left corner like on the GH4. There’s no rear jog wheel but I was never a fan of this on the GH3 and GH4 anyway. The d-pad has ISO, WB, AF and focus zone on directional presses and a menu button in the middle. The video record button is nice and accessible next to the shutter button and the shutter release itself can be used to start and stop video recording, though when the camera stops it is a bit like pressing the brakes on a London bus. Recording is not laggy to start though and that’s more important!

On the right where the card door should be there’s the HDMI port, which does have one benefit – the cables don’t point into your face if the camera is rigged up on your shoulder. However, this isn’t a camera many users are going to want or need to rig up.

FZ1000 24p

The lens ring has a dual purpose. It can be toggled between zooming action and focus. Now with the AF lock-on at the start of a shot being a nice fast convenient substitute for manual focus here, there are of course times when you want to rack focus during a shot. At these times, the camera offers a superb feel to the focus ring and a plethora of aids. This is really good for a camera in this class. Peaking works whilst punched into the magnified focus assist and you can set the magnified zoom to appear in a window rather than taking up the whole composition on the LCD.

Conclusion

When it all comes down to it, the Panasonic FZ1000 is a GH4 with a 25-400mm lens for $899. A very good deal but the trade off for that is the noisier sensor full with 20MP and in 4K a rather small recording area of 3.8x crop, instead of 2.3x on the GH4 (relative to full frame). So it certainly isn’t a dim light camera. The lens is F2.8-4 so there’s no getting away from it. You will not be getting the results of a GH4 at F0.95 with the FZ1000 at night!

Instead it is a shot grabber extraordinaire, a brilliant travelling companion and an all round fun experience. It’s easy to justify the FZ1000 as a second camera if you need a shot grabber.

The FZ1000 is $897.99 – view full specs and details at B&H Photo Video here

Pros

  • Crisp and detailed video quality in 4K with 100Mbit/s codec
  • Very good value for money Leica 25-400mm equiv. lens
  • Very close focus distance (0.3-1m) throughout the range even at the longer end
  • Effective 5 axis image stabilisation even in video mode (though not active in High Speed Video mode)
  • Quick AF in both stills and video mode
  • Very nice EVF given the price point & class of camera
  • Price vs performance ratio makes it attractive and versatile second body
  • Good for beginners who don’t want to invest in, or change a bunch of lenses
  • Familiar and direct ergonomics
  • Responsive to use overall
  • Excellent 120fps high speed video mode
  • Very good raw stills quality in good light, from Sony 20MP 1″ sensor
  • CineLike colour profiles like the GH4
  • Shallow depth of field at longer focal lengths
  • Excellent feel to manual focus and plenty of focus aids, such as peaking
  • Mic input and manual audio control, again unusual for camera in this class

Cons

  • 4K mode loses 25mm wide angle (becomes 35mm)
  • Small GH2 battery not larger GH4 pack
  • Charmless feel to body, build quality feels too plasticy
  • Stabilisation switches off in high speed video mode
  • Not a low light camera due to rather excessive megapixel count and 3.8x crop in 4K mode
  • Internal 1080p codec limited to low bitrates and no ALL-I recording
  • SD card slot in somewhat awkward place

The post Panasonic FZ1000 review – the bargain 4K super-zoom appeared first on EOSHD.

All credit is given to author EOSHDAndrew Reid (EOSHD)

Crowd funding is all the rage when it comes to innovative gadgets these days – check out the Panlight, a remote directional control device for lights and small cameras alike.

Although the Panlight has been primarily targeted at photographers for flash placement, it can equally be useful for filmmakers with use of lightweight lights such as small LED panels.

The Panlight is a designed to sit onto top of a light stand and mounts to your device via cold shoe attachment. The controller allows you to remotely refine the position of the light by adjusting the Panlight with 360 degrees of pan and near 180 degrees of tilt.

panlight 640x213 Panlight Kickstarter   remote directional control for lights and small cameras

The remote control is effective up to 100ft, and is programmable on up to 4 channels to ensure use of multiple Panlights in the same location is possible.

The Panlight takes X4 AA batteries, and can support devices up to 2.2lbs. The thread on the underside is a standard 3/8″ size for tripod & light stands.

As displayed in the video, Panlight could also be used with lightweight cameras for a remote second/third angle. Whilst the movement is unlikely designed to provide a move designed for use in a video, it will enabled you to fine tune angles in hard to reach spaces.

I can see this product becoming a hit with event filmmakers, sparking a likely battle between video and photo guys at weddings for those 4 channels of remote control.

A pledge of $163 today (GBP conversion) will see you on Panlight. For more info of the Panlight, production plans, and rewards check out the Kickstarter page.

The post Panlight Kickstarter – remote directional control for lights and small cameras appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author cinema5D » NewsTim Fok

Crowd funding is all the rage when it comes to innovative gadgets these days – check out the Panlight, a remote directional control device for lights and small cameras alike.

Although the Panlight has been primarily targeted at photographers for flash placement, it can equally be useful for filmmakers with use of lightweight lights such as small LED panels.

The Panlight is a designed to sit onto top of a light stand and mounts to your device via cold shoe attachment. The controller allows you to remotely refine the position of the light by adjusting the Panlight with 360 degrees of pan and near 180 degrees of tilt.

panlight 640x213 Panlight Kickstarter   remote directional control for lights and small cameras

The remote control is effective up to 100ft, and is programmable on up to 4 channels to ensure use of multiple Panlights in the same location is possible.

The Panlight takes X4 AA batteries, and can support devices up to 2.2lbs. The thread on the underside is a standard 3/8″ size for tripod & light stands.

As displayed in the video, Panlight could also be used with lightweight cameras for a remote second/third angle. Whilst the movement is unlikely designed to provide a move designed for use in a video, it will enabled you to fine tune angles in hard to reach spaces.

I can see this product becoming a hit with event filmmakers, sparking a likely battle between video and photo guys at weddings for those 4 channels of remote control.

A pledge of $163 today (GBP conversion) will see you on Panlight. For more info of the Panlight, production plans, and rewards check out the Kickstarter page.

The post Panlight Kickstarter – remote directional control for lights and small cameras appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author cinema5D » NewsTim Fok

Screen Shot 2014-11-21 at 6.31.19 PM

Screen Grab Veydra 16mm T16 200 ASA 180 degree shutter BMPCC

Here is a quick first look at the Veydra Mini Primes for micro four thirds cameras. The Veydra Mini’s consist of a 12mm, 16mm, 25mm, 35mm and 50mm T2.2 prime lens set available on Kickstarter now. The Veydra mini primes are a great purpose built set of lenses for MFT cameras. All lenses have an 80mm outside diameter with a 77mm inner thread.
All lenses are the same length and specifications so the focus drive gear lines up every time. No need to repo for each lens! The look with the set I have is also consistent throughout. Color and clarity matched perfectly.
I will have a QT video up with more tests soon. Here are two examples shot with the Veydra 16mm on the BMPCC in RAW at 200 ASA 24fps 180 degree shutter T16 for the lens flare. T8 for the street shot near Paramount Studios. Download and get your grade on!

Click here for some killer RAW lens flare.

Click here for some fun RAW street stuff.

Click here for more info

8438d9fe0bc290a112d536fe180c30f0_large

 

What is Veydra?

Veydra is a premium cinema lens made specifically for filmmakers using Micro 4/3 cameras.

Veydra Mini Prime lenses all feature

  • Resolution that exceeds 4K
  • Cinema 0.8 module focus and iris gears
  • Consistent front 80mm outside diameter & 77mm filter threading
  • Similar length for quick lens changes
  • Constant T2.2 aperture for easy lighting set ups
  • Plated brass mounts for durability.

All credit is given to author Wide Open CameraJared Abrams

Screen Shot 2014-11-21 at 6.31.19 PM

Screen Grab Veydra 16mm T16 200 ASA 180 degree shutter BMPCC

Here is a quick first look at the Veydra Mini Primes for micro four thirds cameras. The Veydra Mini’s consist of a 12mm, 16mm, 25mm, 35mm and 50mm T2.2 prime lens set available on Kickstarter now. The Veydra mini primes are a great purpose built set of lenses for MFT cameras. All lenses have an 80mm outside diameter with a 77mm inner thread.
All lenses are the same length and specifications so the focus drive gear lines up every time. No need to repo for each lens! The look with the set I have is also consistent throughout. Color and clarity matched perfectly.
I will have a QT video up with more tests soon. Here are two examples shot with the Veydra 16mm on the BMPCC in RAW at 200 ASA 24fps 180 degree shutter T16 for the lens flare. T8 for the street shot near Paramount Studios. Download and get your grade on!

Click here for some killer RAW lens flare.

Click here for some fun RAW street stuff.

Click here for more info

8438d9fe0bc290a112d536fe180c30f0_large

 

What is Veydra?

Veydra is a premium cinema lens made specifically for filmmakers using Micro 4/3 cameras.

Veydra Mini Prime lenses all feature

  • Resolution that exceeds 4K
  • Cinema 0.8 module focus and iris gears
  • Consistent front 80mm outside diameter & 77mm filter threading
  • Similar length for quick lens changes
  • Constant T2.2 aperture for easy lighting set ups
  • Plated brass mounts for durability.

All credit is given to author Wide Open CameraJared Abrams

Click here to view the embedded video.

Thanks to Norbert Bielan in New York for this test footage. You can read his thoughts on shooting with the URSA below.

Blackmagic’s latest unified firmware release is mainly about the URSA and what an update it is. The new firmware bumps the maximum frame rate up to 80fps in 4K and adds a new 3:1 compression setting for raw recording, fitting more material onto CFast cards.

The URSA also makes an interesting back-end for your existing 4K HDMI camera such as the Sony A7S. Has anybody actually tried this combination yet?

First of all here’s Grant Petty to take us through the new firmware update –

Blackmagic have really focussed on rolling out some fantastic firmware updates in recent months, now their unified firmware is up and running.

It’s great to see swiftly added major features to existing products.

The URSA shares a similar sensor to the one in the Blackmagic Production Camera (and likely AJA CION too), but the implementation of it is more advanced than the BMPC.

The sensor is actually capable of 4K at 120fps and it is possible the URSA will ramp up to that speed with future firmware updates.

As it is 80fps makes for a welcome increase of drama in slow-mo shots compared to the 60fps of before.

The footage looks great and it’s a wonderful image in decent light, just don’t take it into a dimly lit situation at ISO 1600 as like the Production Camera, the sensor has a lot of front-side global shutter circuitry which reduces the area available for light gathering.

I’d love to see Blackmagic change the form factor of their 2.5K Cinema Camera next and reduce power consumption for longer run-times on a smaller, less bulky battery. Something in-between the Pocket and Cinema cameras at 2.5K would be great. 2.5K raw is a welcome bump up from plain old 1080p and doesn’t compare too badly to 4K when you upscale it.

Here are Norbert’s views on shooting with the URSA -

I think what Blackmagic Design is doing is absolutely amazing. The image quality that you are getting for the price is truly a wonder. I have the Pocket, the 2.5K, the 4K and now the URSA. The URSA is my favorite camera of the bunch and probably my favorite camera of all time.

At first, I was intimated by the weight (20+ lbs with lens and battery) as I always preferred smaller DSLRs where I can run around quicker and attract less attention to myself, but I fell in love with the 10″ screen and quickly forgot about how heavy it is. Some people knock this screen, but it has completely changed the way I shoot. I always used 5″ or 7″ small monitors for my other cameras, but this 10″ screen brings a new life to filming. Beautiful and bright…you can see everything.

Anyone who knows BM cameras will feel very comfortable using the URSA as the menus are the same except you get certain features in this camera that the others don’t have. Mainly slow-motion. I’ve been using the camera for a few weeks and it’s performance is perfect. There are some minor bugs that they are working out with it, but overall it’s been a great experience.

Positives:
– 10″ screen
– 4K 80FPS (new firmware)
– Focus Peaking is great (especially @ISO 200)
– In-camera formatting (new firmware)
– Option of various frame guides (new firmware)
– Phantom Power (new firmware)
– The touchscreen menu and interface…so simple and beautiful.

Negatives:
– Weight
– Black sun spot still there (it’s frustrating, but I’ve heard removing it may affect dynamic range)
– Highlights clip a little too easily
– Sometimes a very thin line from the right edge of the frame gets recorded to the left edge of the frame making it look like a corrupt clip (BM acknowledged this and are working on a fix)…I just zoom in 102% in the edit and it’s gone.
– Huge file sizes (8 minutes of 4K/60P ProRes HQ on a 120GB card)

Everyone knows that BM look and the URSA has the best one so far. I personally think the quality is better than the BMPC (same sensor) because maybe the cooling system has something to do with it, but I can’t confirm that. Overall, I love this camera.

The post First footage of the Blackmagic URSA at 80fps in 4K appeared first on EOSHD.

All credit is given to author EOSHDAndrew Reid (EOSHD)