Journalist Ammar Al Waeli is very lucky. While on assignment for Iraq’s Afaq TV in Mosul a sniper bullet almost hit him in the upper torso, but a simple GoPro saved his life. Video of the harrowing experience is below: 

The bullet strikes Ammar Al Waeli’s GoPro mounted to his body armor at 0:17 and completely disintegrates the camera. CNN is reporting that he was uninjured during the encounter. The Iraqi city of Mosul has seen heavy fighting since late 2016 as the Iraqi military has attempted to regain control of this major city from ISIS fighters.

Other photojournalists from several other news agencies have been on the ground reporting from Mosul over the last few months. Journalist Gabriel Chaim captured the devastation from the air using a small drone. You can view his footage HERE.

Source: CNN

The post GoPro Saves Cameraman From Sniper Shot appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DGraham Sheldon

How to Make a Video Tutorial

Ever heard the Andy Warhol quote, "In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes"? The future is here, and I propose that the modern version is that everyone has at least 15 minutes of knowledge to teach and share.

When people need to pick up a new skill to make a repair or advance in their career, they are likely to search for a video. In the last few months, I've turned to YouTube to learn how to replace car headlights and a failing MacBook cooling fan, and to learn computer programming.

If you're ready to share your knowledge, you might be considering creating your first video. In this tutorial, I'll walk you through planning and creating a video tutorial.

Video Tutorial Formats

When you're ready to start teaching with video, it helps to consider the format of what you want to produce. Here are a few formats to consider:

Live Video

Live video helps the viewer connect to the teacher on a personal level. Watching an expert practice her craft really helps the viewer understand the steps required. It's pretty easy to press record, walk the viewer through the process, and share it with an audience.

You don't need an expensive camera for live video; most smartphones are viable options for recording video now, so you likely already have the tool you need to record.

Live video requires preparation, however. Knowing your lines—or at least a general idea of what to say when the camera starts rolling—will greatly improve your outcome.

Keys to the live video format:

  • Get comfortable on-camera by having a good feel for your lines.
  • Find a way to stabilize your video camera for solid video using a tool like a tripod, or even just a level surface to rest the camera on.
  • Most importantly, be yourself and let your personality come through in the video.

For Example

David Bode is one of the most passionate instructors on the Tuts+ team. His videos always leave me excited about the lessons ahead. Here's an example from his Introduction to Video Editing course:

 

There are few people who seem to derive as much joy from teaching as Alton Browne. His videos on cooking are not only entertaining, but also incredibly educational.

Screencasts

A screencast is a video recording of the computer screen, with spoken word audio recorded as a narration.

Screencasting is one of my favorite ways to teach software and computer skills. It's like giving the viewer an "over the shoulder" view of an expert. With a recorded screencast, you can scale your teaching practice without the viewers crowded around your computer.

Keys to the screencast format:

  • Ideally, for better quality, use an external microphone instead of the one built into your computer.
  • A tidy desktop free from distractions will reduce viewers' distractions.
  • Limited use of callouts can focus viewers' attention on important moments.

For Example

Presentations

Presentations are recorded videos of slides (think PowerPoint or Keynote slides, for example) with recorded audio. These are popular for webcasts, and are kind of the "minimum viable" video lesson.

Keys to the presentation format:

  • Don't read directly from the slides; use them instead as a presentation aid.
  • Break up the slides with images and visual aids.
  • Keep these types of videos brief; viewers are unlikely to watch lengthy presentation videos.

For Example

The slide below was used in a lesson I recorded for a course on Apple Photos. Sometimes, the best way to present information is outside of the application, particularly when talking about theories that are hard to illustrate.

Mixed-Media

There's no reason that your video has to strictly adhere to one format. If you have advanced skills like animation, feel free to mix those in as well. 

At the start of this video, I created a faux animation by cross-fading layered images. It illustrates the concept without diving into the application.

It's also great to incorporate more than one style of teaching for variety. Consider starting a screencast with a live video intro, or breaking up a presentation style video with short screencast clips.

Planning a Video

After you've selected the right format for the job, it's time to plan the specifics of your video.

Set the Outcome

When I plan a video, I start with one key question: At the end of this video, what should the viewer be left with? I like to call this the learning outcome. Set the learning outcome at the start of the process, and make sure the video format and script fit.

"I really just try to break explanations down to their simplest form and also try and mention other things in the field that may be relatable to the viewer." —Charles Yeager, Tuts+ Instructor

I phrase my learning outcomes as, "At the end of the lesson, the viewer should... ." Here are a few ideas for learning outcomes:

At the end of the lesson, the viewer should...

  • Understand why it's important to learn HTML and CSS to create a portfolio website.
  • Be excited about learning Adobe Lightroom's Library module.
  • Know how to use the RAW processing features of Affinity Photo.

Write the Script

After you've set the learning outcome, it's time to write a script and plan the details of your video. If you're teaching a complex subject, consider breaking your video up into small, easily digestible pieces for the viewer to consume. Having bite-sized lessons can make a complex subject easier to understand.

In this video, I initially started with a written script for teaching a new technique; however, It was easier to ad-lib certain parts of the video. Nonetheless, writing the script made me realize everything that needed to be included.

When I produce screencasts, I write a script for them. That doesn't mean that I have to read from it exactly; instead, the script writing process makes me consider what needs to be included in the video. By the time I've completed the script, I can often ad-lib the lesson just as well as read it.

Press Record

After you've set your plans, it's time to get down to recording. All of the planning and preparation takes the pressure off of this step.

I'm hardly a seasoned video expert like many of the Tuts+ instructors, but I worked with editor Jackson Couse to build my skills to the point that I'm now comfortable working with video.

What happens at this phase is highly dependent on the style of video that you've chosen. However, there are some guidelines that are important whether you're recording a screencast, live video, or presentation:

  • Two takes are always better than one. Even when I feel like I've totally nailed the delivery, it helps to have two videos to choose from.
  • Eliminating any distracting noises or background sound is a must.
  • Having a friend to help out and offer encouragement is helpful.

Edit Your Video

Use the editing process to follow the same principles we've outlined above. If a video is too lengthy, use the edit to break a lengthy video into more manageable lessons, for example. Aim for three to five minute lessons in most cases.

 

Melody Nieves' tutorial on how to create a scatter photo effect is a great example of keeping the video lively through editing. 

Here are three great reads to master the software side of the editing process:

  • Check out David Bode's Introduction to Video Editing course to learn the important parts of editing a video.
  • When you're ready to choose a specific editor like Final Cut Pro or Sony Vegas Pro, use these links to access tutorials that will help you learn how to use the applications.
  • Auphonic is a powerful, artificial intelligence powered solution to improve your audio. Read this tutorial to learn more.

Recap & Keep Learning

Here are a few ideas to keep learning more about producing video:

  • If you're nervous about recording your first video production, read (and read again) Melody Nieves' piece "Live Video: What's Keeping You From Hitting Record?" I can't recommend it enough.
  • If you're interested in seeing how I produce courses for Tuts+, check out my article that takes you from start to finish. 
  • I suggested using a smartphone earlier to record your live, on-camera video. The audio quality is much better with a lapel microphone, so follow this tutorial by Harry Guiness to learn how to use your smartphone and lapel mic together.

Do you teach with video? What do you think is different about teaching with video than with other formats? Share your thoughts in the comments.

All credit is given to author Envato Tuts+ Photo & VideoAndrew Childress

SlingStudio is a new product recently announced at the NABShow. With the popularity of Multi-Camera Live Streaming videos growing over the past year, I find this is one of the most innovative products to drop in 2017.

With the SlingStudio you can take advantage of using (ios and Android) smartphones as inexpensive wireless cameras, or use any of your professional cameras by adding their CameraLink adapter. Here's an unboxing and general setup with the brand new SlingStudio.

How it works:
The SlingStudio Hub can work off of battery power, so it's truly portable. Once you power it on, it acts as a wireless access point. Install the SlingStudio Capture app on your smart device and connect to the SlingStudio Hub (wifi network). From an iPad with the SlingStudio Console app installed, you can view all of the different video being streamed from every device connected.

You can choose to record just the program feed locally on an SDXC card, or external USB drive as your switching camera angles, or you can record each of the feeds individually to edit later. There is also a dedicated Audio line in if you're working with a mixer or even a simple wireless mic system. If you have internet access at your location, you can choose to Broadcast Live to any of the popular social networks (Facebook, YouTube, etc).

There's a number of features any multi-camera live production would need such as graphic overlays, and various transitions. When working with a Smartphone and Capture app, there's even a Tally display that tells the operator when their camera angle is being used.

Pros:
The most exciting part of SlingStudio for me is the completely wireless workflow - right down to the Hub running off battery power. Not only can you use accessible smart devices for a multi-camera production, but you can also add your professional camera systems.

Notes:
I haven't had the chance to test SlingStudio in a long project yet, but there are a few things I could already advise. If you're planning on using a smartphone, use good hardware. The better the hardware, the smoother the video will stream back to the SlingStudio hub. And if you're planning on shooting for a short while, make sure you have a charger on hand. The Wifi connection and streaming video back to the hub consumes a fair amount of battery power.

There's also a small 2 second or so delay in the video feed when viewing from the iPad. This is not something to be concerned about if you're not outputting the display to a live audience in real time. People who are watching from a Live Stream on the internet are usually delayed 30-45 seconds by providers like Facebook and YouTube anyways. The delay is also not a problem if you're planning to just record all the streams to edit later.

I'm excited to try the new SlingStudio out on a few projects, but if you have any questions or comments now, let me know. I'll try to implement those answers on my next follow up video.

Or read more about the new SlingStudio (here):

SlingStudio Wireless Live Switch Live Stream Live Production
SlingStudio Multi-Cam Live Switch + Stream + Record

All credit is given to author CheesyCamCheesycam


When you want an easier way to start and stop video on your sony cameras, I recommend getting this inexpensive Fotga remote. I've had this remote for a while, and it's worked with my Sony A7s, RX10, A6500, etc. Basically it should work with any Sony camera that uses a multiport usb input.


Fotga Start Video and Zoom Remote for Sony

All credit is given to author CheesyCamCheesycam

A Taste of New York is a new time-lapse film that has been getting a lot of attention since it was published. It features some new and interesting techniques and a lot of motion designing. We had a quick interview with the creators of the video.

The times when time-lapse videos were just simple compilations of tripod clips with music in background are long gone. Today’s best time-lapse videos are all about motion, story and sound design – something that Austria-based video production company FilmSpektakel is well aware of. Their latest piece is the third instalment in their independent A Taste Of… series, and this time they bring us to New York City.

Peter Jablonowski, Thomas Pöcksteiner and Lorenz Pritz are the filmmakers behind this time-lapse film. They spent ten days in NYC in September 2016, during which they set out to collect a lot of great angles – including from an actual helicopter. They shot 65,000 photos, which took up 2,6 TB of storage space. The final 3-minute video took 36 hours to render on the best-equipped iMac available.

Skyline timelapse clip. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

One of the most interesting shots in the video is the clip of the yellow cabs. The guys took photos of yellow cabs whenever they got a chance, covering them from as many different angles as possible. They gathered 2,000 photos in total and compiled them into a hyper lapse around a cab in post production. It took them 5 whole days of post work to get this one shot.

We asked Peter Jablonowski a few questions about the video:

c5D: How did you come up with the idea of going to New York to shoot the next episode in your A Taste Of… series?

Peter: We always had the plan to try our A Taste Of… series on an international level, so we were looking for a country or city to do this experiment in. We’ve been to New York two times before so we already knew the city, which made it easier for us to accomplish this project.

c5D: I guess that the Yellow Cab clip was the hardest and most time-consuming clip in the video, especially from a post-production point of view. Are there any other clips that were also difficult to shoot? Did you have to overcome any extraordinary obstacles to get the exact angle you wanted?

Peter: The helicopter ride was one of the best and at the same time most challenging things we experienced in NYC. We had never been on a helicopter before and flying in between those skyscrapers is pure adrenaline. Trying to take stable pictures while having the doors off is extremely difficult. We first tried it with the help of a single-handed gimbal (CAME-TV Single) which worked fine when the helicopter hovered above one place, but during movement it failed completely because of the strong winds. Most of the helicopter shots in the video are hand-held and stabilized in post production.

The helicopter shot was handheld. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

c5D: Did you have any problems with the police or other authorities when setting up tripods and all the gear on the streets? Did you have to get any permissions for all that?

Peter: Luckily we had no problems with police at all. We were well aware of where tripods are allowed (on the streets, etc.) and where and when tripods they are forbidden. In these cases, we knew how to make do with sand bags, magic arms or even with a stack of tissues. For each location we tried to bring as little gear as possible so we wouldn’t attract too much attention. The authorities were very friendly and appreciated our awareness of the rules and laws.

c5D: Any funny BTS stories of your NYC shoot?

Peter: Building security kicked us out of our Airbnb after a few nights because it was being let illegally. We didn’t know anything about that, so we had no plan B when security told us to be gone within one hour or else the cops would show up. Airbnb handled it very well and booked us a hotel right next to Times Square, so we were lucky after all to be right in the city center.

c5D: Do you already have a plan for the next episode in the A Taste Of… series? If you do, which location do you have in sight?

Peter: Yes, we are continuing these A Taste Of… videos, and in fact the next episode has already been shot. To be honest, we are not quite sure when to release it… It will be in a few more months in the future, I guess… Where the next one will take place is still a secret, but if you are following us on Facebook, you could already take a good guess ;-)
A taste of

Getting multiple clips at once. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

In terms of equipment, FilmSpektakel used a Sony A7R II, Sony a6300 and two Canon 6D bodies. There is a full list of equipment along with other additional information directly in the video description on the Vimeo link. All episodes of A Taste Of… have received a Vimeo Staff Pick award, so it is really worth watching the older pieces too. Links for those are also in the Vimeo page of the video.

Feeling inspired to shoot a time-lapse video now? Do you have any samples you would like to share? Let us know in the comments below!

The post “A Taste of New York” – An Inspiring Time Lapse Journey Through NYC appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DJakub Han

A Taste of New York is a new time-lapse film that has been getting a lot of attention since it was published. It features some new and interesting techniques and a lot of motion designing. We had a quick interview with the creators of the video.

The times when time-lapse videos were just simple compilations of tripod clips with music in background are long gone. Today’s best time-lapse videos are all about motion, story and sound design – something that Austria-based video production company FilmSpektakel is well aware of. Their latest piece is the third instalment in their independent A Taste Of… series, and this time they bring us to New York City.

Peter Jablonowski, Thomas Pöcksteiner and Lorenz Pritz are the filmmakers behind this time-lapse film. They spent ten days in NYC in September 2016, during which they set out to collect a lot of great angles – including from an actual helicopter. They shot 65,000 photos, which took up 2,6 TB of storage space. The final 3-minute video took 36 hours to render on the best-equipped iMac available.

Skyline timelapse clip. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

One of the most interesting shots in the video is the clip of the yellow cabs. The guys took photos of yellow cabs whenever they got a chance, covering them from as many different angles as possible. They gathered 2,000 photos in total and compiled them into a hyper lapse around a cab in post production. It took them 5 whole days of post work to get this one shot.

We asked Peter Jablonowski a few questions about the video:

c5D: How did you come up with the idea of going to New York to shoot the next episode in your A Taste Of… series?

Peter: We always had the plan to try our A Taste Of… series on an international level, so we were looking for a country or city to do this experiment in. We’ve been to New York two times before so we already knew the city, which made it easier for us to accomplish this project.

c5D: I guess that the Yellow Cab clip was the hardest and most time-consuming clip in the video, especially from a post-production point of view. Are there any other clips that were also difficult to shoot? Did you have to overcome any extraordinary obstacles to get the exact angle you wanted?

Peter: The helicopter ride was one of the best and at the same time most challenging things we experienced in NYC. We had never been on a helicopter before and flying in between those skyscrapers is pure adrenaline. Trying to take stable pictures while having the doors off is extremely difficult. We first tried it with the help of a single-handed gimbal (CAME-TV Single) which worked fine when the helicopter hovered above one place, but during movement it failed completely because of the strong winds. Most of the helicopter shots in the video are hand-held and stabilized in post production.

The helicopter shot was handheld. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

c5D: Did you have any problems with the police or other authorities when setting up tripods and all the gear on the streets? Did you have to get any permissions for all that?

Peter: Luckily we had no problems with police at all. We were well aware of where tripods are allowed (on the streets, etc.) and where and when tripods they are forbidden. In these cases, we knew how to make do with sand bags, magic arms or even with a stack of tissues. For each location we tried to bring as little gear as possible so we wouldn’t attract too much attention. The authorities were very friendly and appreciated our awareness of the rules and laws.

c5D: Any funny BTS stories of your NYC shoot?

Peter: Building security kicked us out of our Airbnb after a few nights because it was being let illegally. We didn’t know anything about that, so we had no plan B when security told us to be gone within one hour or else the cops would show up. Airbnb handled it very well and booked us a hotel right next to Times Square, so we were lucky after all to be right in the city center.

c5D: Do you already have a plan for the next episode in the A Taste Of… series? If you do, which location do you have in sight?

Peter: Yes, we are continuing these A Taste Of… videos, and in fact the next episode has already been shot. To be honest, we are not quite sure when to release it… It will be in a few more months in the future, I guess… Where the next one will take place is still a secret, but if you are following us on Facebook, you could already take a good guess ;-)
A taste of

Getting multiple clips at once. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

In terms of equipment, FilmSpektakel used a Sony A7R II, Sony a6300 and two Canon 6D bodies. There is a full list of equipment along with other additional information directly in the video description on the Vimeo link. All episodes of A Taste Of… have received a Vimeo Staff Pick award, so it is really worth watching the older pieces too. Links for those are also in the Vimeo page of the video.

Feeling inspired to shoot a time-lapse video now? Do you have any samples you would like to share? Let us know in the comments below!

The post “A Taste of New York” – An Inspiring Time Lapse Journey Through NYC appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DJakub Han

A Taste of New York is a new time-lapse film that has been getting a lot of attention since it was published. It features some new and interesting techniques and a lot of motion designing. We had a quick interview with the creators of the video.

The times when time-lapse videos were just simple compilations of tripod clips with music in background are long gone. Today’s best time-lapse videos are all about motion, story and sound design – something that Austria-based video production company FilmSpektakel is well aware of. Their latest piece is the third instalment in their independent A Taste Of… series, and this time they bring us to New York City.

Peter Jablonowski, Thomas Pöcksteiner and Lorenz Pritz are the filmmakers behind this time-lapse film. They spent ten days in NYC in September 2016, during which they set out to collect a lot of great angles – including from an actual helicopter. They shot 65,000 photos, which took up 2,6 TB of storage space. The final 3-minute video took 36 hours to render on the best-equipped iMac available.

Skyline timelapse clip. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

One of the most interesting shots in the video is the clip of the yellow cabs. The guys took photos of yellow cabs whenever they got a chance, covering them from as many different angles as possible. They gathered 2,000 photos in total and compiled them into a hyper lapse around a cab in post production. It took them 5 whole days of post work to get this one shot.

We asked Peter Jablonowski a few questions about the video:

c5D: How did you come up with the idea of going to New York to shoot the next episode in your A Taste Of… series?

Peter: We always had the plan to try our A Taste Of… series on an international level, so we were looking for a country or city to do this experiment in. We’ve been to New York two times before so we already knew the city, which made it easier for us to accomplish this project.

c5D: I guess that the Yellow Cab clip was the hardest and most time-consuming clip in the video, especially from a post-production point of view. Are there any other clips that were also difficult to shoot? Did you have to overcome any extraordinary obstacles to get the exact angle you wanted?

Peter: The helicopter ride was one of the best and at the same time most challenging things we experienced in NYC. We had never been on a helicopter before and flying in between those skyscrapers is pure adrenaline. Trying to take stable pictures while having the doors off is extremely difficult. We first tried it with the help of a single-handed gimbal (CAME-TV Single) which worked fine when the helicopter hovered above one place, but during movement it failed completely because of the strong winds. Most of the helicopter shots in the video are hand-held and stabilized in post production.

The helicopter shot was handheld. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

c5D: Did you have any problems with the police or other authorities when setting up tripods and all the gear on the streets? Did you have to get any permissions for all that?

Peter: Luckily we had no problems with police at all. We were well aware of where tripods are allowed (on the streets, etc.) and where and when tripods they are forbidden. In these cases, we knew how to make do with sand bags, magic arms or even with a stack of tissues. For each location we tried to bring as little gear as possible so we wouldn’t attract too much attention. The authorities were very friendly and appreciated our awareness of the rules and laws.

c5D: Any funny BTS stories of your NYC shoot?

Peter: Building security kicked us out of our Airbnb after a few nights because it was being let illegally. We didn’t know anything about that, so we had no plan B when security told us to be gone within one hour or else the cops would show up. Airbnb handled it very well and booked us a hotel right next to Times Square, so we were lucky after all to be right in the city center.

c5D: Do you already have a plan for the next episode in the A Taste Of… series? If you do, which location do you have in sight?

Peter: Yes, we are continuing these A Taste Of… videos, and in fact the next episode has already been shot. To be honest, we are not quite sure when to release it… It will be in a few more months in the future, I guess… Where the next one will take place is still a secret, but if you are following us on Facebook, you could already take a good guess ;-)
A taste of

Getting multiple clips at once. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

In terms of equipment, FilmSpektakel used a Sony A7R II, Sony a6300 and two Canon 6D bodies. There is a full list of equipment along with other additional information directly in the video description on the Vimeo link. All episodes of A Taste Of… have received a Vimeo Staff Pick award, so it is really worth watching the older pieces too. Links for those are also in the Vimeo page of the video.

Feeling inspired to shoot a time-lapse video now? Do you have any samples you would like to share? Let us know in the comments below!

The post “A Taste of New York” – An Inspiring Time Lapse Journey Through NYC appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DJakub Han

A Taste of New York is a new time-lapse film that has been getting a lot of attention since it was published. It features some new and interesting techniques and a lot of motion designing. We had a quick interview with the creators of the video.

The times when time-lapse videos were just simple compilations of tripod clips with music in background are long gone. Today’s best time-lapse videos are all about motion, story and sound design – something that Austria-based video production company FilmSpektakel is well aware of. Their latest piece is the third instalment in their independent A Taste Of… series, and this time they bring us to New York City.

Peter Jablonowski, Thomas Pöcksteiner and Lorenz Pritz are the filmmakers behind this time-lapse film. They spent ten days in NYC in September 2016, during which they set out to collect a lot of great angles – including from an actual helicopter. They shot 65,000 photos, which took up 2,6 TB of storage space. The final 3-minute video took 36 hours to render on the best-equipped iMac available.

Skyline timelapse clip. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

One of the most interesting shots in the video is the clip of the yellow cabs. The guys took photos of yellow cabs whenever they got a chance, covering them from as many different angles as possible. They gathered 2,000 photos in total and compiled them into a hyper lapse around a cab in post production. It took them 5 whole days of post work to get this one shot.

We asked Peter Jablonowski a few questions about the video:

c5D: How did you come up with the idea of going to New York to shoot the next episode in your A Taste Of… series?

Peter: We always had the plan to try our A Taste Of… series on an international level, so we were looking for a country or city to do this experiment in. We’ve been to New York two times before so we already knew the city, which made it easier for us to accomplish this project.

c5D: I guess that the Yellow Cab clip was the hardest and most time-consuming clip in the video, especially from a post-production point of view. Are there any other clips that were also difficult to shoot? Did you have to overcome any extraordinary obstacles to get the exact angle you wanted?

Peter: The helicopter ride was one of the best and at the same time most challenging things we experienced in NYC. We had never been on a helicopter before and flying in between those skyscrapers is pure adrenaline. Trying to take stable pictures while having the doors off is extremely difficult. We first tried it with the help of a single-handed gimbal (CAME-TV Single) which worked fine when the helicopter hovered above one place, but during movement it failed completely because of the strong winds. Most of the helicopter shots in the video are hand-held and stabilized in post production.

The helicopter shot was handheld. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

c5D: Did you have any problems with the police or other authorities when setting up tripods and all the gear on the streets? Did you have to get any permissions for all that?

Peter: Luckily we had no problems with police at all. We were well aware of where tripods are allowed (on the streets, etc.) and where and when tripods they are forbidden. In these cases, we knew how to make do with sand bags, magic arms or even with a stack of tissues. For each location we tried to bring as little gear as possible so we wouldn’t attract too much attention. The authorities were very friendly and appreciated our awareness of the rules and laws.

c5D: Any funny BTS stories of your NYC shoot?

Peter: Building security kicked us out of our Airbnb after a few nights because it was being let illegally. We didn’t know anything about that, so we had no plan B when security told us to be gone within one hour or else the cops would show up. Airbnb handled it very well and booked us a hotel right next to Times Square, so we were lucky after all to be right in the city center.

c5D: Do you already have a plan for the next episode in the A Taste Of… series? If you do, which location do you have in sight?

Peter: Yes, we are continuing these A Taste Of… videos, and in fact the next episode has already been shot. To be honest, we are not quite sure when to release it… It will be in a few more months in the future, I guess… Where the next one will take place is still a secret, but if you are following us on Facebook, you could already take a good guess ;-)
A taste of

Getting multiple clips at once. Image credit: FilmSpektakel

In terms of equipment, FilmSpektakel used a Sony A7R II, Sony a6300 and two Canon 6D bodies. There is a full list of equipment along with other additional information directly in the video description on the Vimeo link. All episodes of A Taste Of… have received a Vimeo Staff Pick award, so it is really worth watching the older pieces too. Links for those are also in the Vimeo page of the video.

Feeling inspired to shoot a time-lapse video now? Do you have any samples you would like to share? Let us know in the comments below!

The post “A Taste of New York” – An Inspiring Time Lapse Journey Through NYC appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DJakub Han

I don’t know about you, but here at Tuts+ we are very excited for Blade Runner 2049, so we thought we’d tip our hat to the futuristic dystopia and show you how to create your own futuristic city effect in Adobe Photoshop.

Getting Started

What You’ll Need

If you’d like to follow along with the tutorial, you can download the example I’m working on. 

Installing the Action

When you unzip the action's folder, you'll see that the download is comprised of an action, a brush, and a pattern. You’ll need to install all three of these for the action to work.

Avoiding Trouble

  • Your image needs to be in RGB colour space and, as mentioned, high resolution. (This Tuts+ tutorial will help you sort out what resolution you need.)
  • Make sure your brush opacity is up to 100% before you run the action, or certain layers may appear faded out.
  • Your background layer should be called Background and be the only layer in your file before you run the action.

Running The Action

Select the Number of Pixels

There’s a stopping point right after you start the action, which will look like this:

radius
Changing the number of pixels will determine how much detail will be included.

The action is asking you to set the range of pixels that will be affected by the action. The more pixels you select, the heavier the action will be, and a little goes a long way. This is the difference between 2px (left) and 4px (right):

comparison
2px (left) and 4px (right). Small changes make quite a difference.

I’ve stuck to 2px

After setting the number of pixels, the action will continue to run and add all sorts of bright delights.

Making Changes

This is the image once the action has finished running:

after action
This is how the action looks once it's run, without any adjustments.

Get to Grips With Layers

There’s a lot going on here, and a lot of layers too:

layers
The action is broken down into a number of layers, many with a mask so you can make simple, non-destructive changes.

First, hide the Plexus Element layer. That will kill the blue light effect at the top of your image. We’ll come back to it later.

Bring Back Detail

There’s a layer called Brush Mask to Reveal Unaltered Scene. You won't be surprised to see that if you brush over the mask with a white brush…

brush over brings back details
Brushing over the mask reveals the city underneath.

... you reveal the city in your original image. With a low opacity, soft brush, bring some of the detail back into the image, working from the bottom up.

bring back details slowly
Bring back the details of the city gradually. You can always come back and add or remove more.

I’ve stayed away from the sky when brushing over the mask and mostly concentrated on the foreground buildings. I’ve also very lightly brushed over the skyscrapers in the background to give them a little more detail, so they don’t just look like hollow outlines.

Adjust Colours

The colours in the image are all created with colour fill or gradient layers with layer masks, so you can brush out particular elements or change the colour entirely. The colours you see in the processed image will have been generated from the colours in the original image you used.

Duplicate the Gradient Fill 1 layer and hide the original, in case you want to revert to it. Then double click on the duplicated gradient and experiment with the colours until you find something you like. Remember, you can dip the opacity or brush out the effect on the mask, to bring back some of the original layer, for a more subtle effect.

gradients
Gradients and colour fill layers can be changed to suit.

Under Scene Effects Scene Effect 1, you’ll find background details like the clouds and lines around the buildings. I’ve changed these to white:

Scene effects
Adjust the colours of lines around the buildings.

Light Elements 1 and 2 are the small squares and sharp lines of light. If you select the layer's effects (click fx), you can change the colour of the light elements and other blending options. If you do change the Colour Overlay effect, remember you may need to adjust the Outer Glow colour to match. I’ve mixed white with hot pink here:

colour adjustments
Try and keep colours interesting and think futuristic and neon. Basically, be tasteless!

You might also want to take out some of the small squares (Light Element 1) if they’re too distracting. Just add a layer mask and brush squares out until it looks right:

remove some squares
Remove anything that looks too distracting. You can always remove more later or brush them back in if you change your mind.

Come Back to Hidden Layers

By now you should be ready to come back to the Plexus layer that we hid at the start. Your city might look better without that layer, in which case leave it off. If you’d like to include it, you might want to change the colour to suit other amendments you’ve made. To do that, select the Colour Fill layer just above Plexus Element. Double click the colour fill to change the colour of that layer.

plexus layer
The Plexus layer makes the image very busy.

As with the Light Elements, the Plexus additions make the picture incredibly busy again. If you want to reduce that, just add a layer mask to the Plexus Element layer and brush out to suit. You also have this graphic element installed as a brush, so there’s an option to add more or mix it up with more than one colour.

Finish Up

finished image
Make final adjustments.

I took out the Plexus layer altogether as it was all a bit busy. I also reduced the number of light squares and brushed in some more city detail.

The great thing about this action is that you can hit play and get a nice result, even if you’re not confident about changing the layers. However, if you want to get something more customised, you can do that too; each layer is editable and it’s easy to make changes.

This action does work best when you chose an image with strong lines, so as you’d expect from the name, it fits architectural pictures best.

Here are some more examples using the action:

example 1
Upward perspectives work nicely.
example 2
A minimalist look can also work well.

All credit is given to author Envato Tuts+ Photo & VideoMarie Gardiner

I don’t know about you, but here at Tuts+ we are very excited for Blade Runner 2049, so we thought we’d tip our hat to the futuristic dystopia and show you how to create your own futuristic city effect in Adobe Photoshop.

Getting Started

What You’ll Need

If you’d like to follow along with the tutorial, you can download the example I’m working on. 

Installing the Action

When you unzip the action's folder, you'll see that the download is comprised of an action, a brush, and a pattern. You’ll need to install all three of these for the action to work.

Avoiding Trouble

  • Your image needs to be in RGB colour space and, as mentioned, high resolution. (This Tuts+ tutorial will help you sort out what resolution you need.)
  • Make sure your brush opacity is up to 100% before you run the action, or certain layers may appear faded out.
  • Your background layer should be called Background and be the only layer in your file before you run the action.

Running The Action

Select the Number of Pixels

There’s a stopping point right after you start the action, which will look like this:

radius
Changing the number of pixels will determine how much detail will be included.

The action is asking you to set the range of pixels that will be affected by the action. The more pixels you select, the heavier the action will be, and a little goes a long way. This is the difference between 2px (left) and 4px (right):

comparison
2px (left) and 4px (right). Small changes make quite a difference.

I’ve stuck to 2px

After setting the number of pixels, the action will continue to run and add all sorts of bright delights.

Making Changes

This is the image once the action has finished running:

after action
This is how the action looks once it's run, without any adjustments.

Get to Grips With Layers

There’s a lot going on here, and a lot of layers too:

layers
The action is broken down into a number of layers, many with a mask so you can make simple, non-destructive changes.

First, hide the Plexus Element layer. That will kill the blue light effect at the top of your image. We’ll come back to it later.

Bring Back Detail

There’s a layer called Brush Mask to Reveal Unaltered Scene. You won't be surprised to see that if you brush over the mask with a white brush…

brush over brings back details
Brushing over the mask reveals the city underneath.

... you reveal the city in your original image. With a low opacity, soft brush, bring some of the detail back into the image, working from the bottom up.

bring back details slowly
Bring back the details of the city gradually. You can always come back and add or remove more.

I’ve stayed away from the sky when brushing over the mask and mostly concentrated on the foreground buildings. I’ve also very lightly brushed over the skyscrapers in the background to give them a little more detail, so they don’t just look like hollow outlines.

Adjust Colours

The colours in the image are all created with colour fill or gradient layers with layer masks, so you can brush out particular elements or change the colour entirely. The colours you see in the processed image will have been generated from the colours in the original image you used.

Duplicate the Gradient Fill 1 layer and hide the original, in case you want to revert to it. Then double click on the duplicated gradient and experiment with the colours until you find something you like. Remember, you can dip the opacity or brush out the effect on the mask, to bring back some of the original layer, for a more subtle effect.

gradients
Gradients and colour fill layers can be changed to suit.

Under Scene Effects Scene Effect 1, you’ll find background details like the clouds and lines around the buildings. I’ve changed these to white:

Scene effects
Adjust the colours of lines around the buildings.

Light Elements 1 and 2 are the small squares and sharp lines of light. If you select the layer's effects (click fx), you can change the colour of the light elements and other blending options. If you do change the Colour Overlay effect, remember you may need to adjust the Outer Glow colour to match. I’ve mixed white with hot pink here:

colour adjustments
Try and keep colours interesting and think futuristic and neon. Basically, be tasteless!

You might also want to take out some of the small squares (Light Element 1) if they’re too distracting. Just add a layer mask and brush squares out until it looks right:

remove some squares
Remove anything that looks too distracting. You can always remove more later or brush them back in if you change your mind.

Come Back to Hidden Layers

By now you should be ready to come back to the Plexus layer that we hid at the start. Your city might look better without that layer, in which case leave it off. If you’d like to include it, you might want to change the colour to suit other amendments you’ve made. To do that, select the Colour Fill layer just above Plexus Element. Double click the colour fill to change the colour of that layer.

plexus layer
The Plexus layer makes the image very busy.

As with the Light Elements, the Plexus additions make the picture incredibly busy again. If you want to reduce that, just add a layer mask to the Plexus Element layer and brush out to suit. You also have this graphic element installed as a brush, so there’s an option to add more or mix it up with more than one colour.

Finish Up

finished image
Make final adjustments.

I took out the Plexus layer altogether as it was all a bit busy. I also reduced the number of light squares and brushed in some more city detail.

The great thing about this action is that you can hit play and get a nice result, even if you’re not confident about changing the layers. However, if you want to get something more customised, you can do that too; each layer is editable and it’s easy to make changes.

This action does work best when you chose an image with strong lines, so as you’d expect from the name, it fits architectural pictures best.

Here are some more examples using the action:

example 1
Upward perspectives work nicely.
example 2
A minimalist look can also work well.

All credit is given to author Envato Tuts+ Photo & VideoMarie Gardiner