Samsung 28 inch 4k monitor U28D590D

If you missed out on the $599 easter pricing on the Samsung 3840×2160 4k monitor I posted earlier this week, you can still pick this monitor up for far less than the $799 the price has shot up to on Amazon. Right now there are a hand full of these monitors on ebay for $629 with free shipping. While it’s still a $30 markup over the original MSRP of $599, it’s a lot more tolerable than the current $200 markup happening everywhere else. Hopefully if all goes well I’ll have mine here sometime next week.

The post Samsung 28-Inch 4k Monitor $629 on ebay appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film Noobdeejay scharton

Canon 5d mark III body 1

As all the new cameras from NAB start to hit the market it affects current camera prices. Right now you can pickup the Canon 5d mark III body with free shipping for just $2560 on ebay. That’s about $500 to $700 less than the normal pricing. I’ve purchased a number of cameras from this particular seller and had pretty good luck, but keep in mind they normally require a signature for delivery which can be an issue for some. Also, these cameras are often from a lens/body combo package with the lens removed. It’s not a huge issue, but you do end up with a larger box. For the price it’s usually worth it. As with all of these sales there are a limited number of cameras so if you want one, you might want to move fast.

The post Canon 5d mark III body on sale for $2,560 appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film Noobdeejay scharton

Lytro Illum

Lytro has announced its second plenoptic camera, bringing light field technology into a much more user friendly package. The Lytro Illum sports a 1″ sensor, 30-250mm equivalent constant aperture f/2.0 lens, and a 4″ touchscreen.

Light field or plenoptic cameras are fascinating. They capture 4D light information using a micro lens array, enabling you to alter framing and focus after a shot has been taken.

Despite being around for a while, this technology caused a stir around two years ago, when Lytro announced the Lytro Light Field Camera, one of the first consumer plenoptic cameras to be released.

Although labelled a consumer camera, the Lytro_stackedaesthetics left a little to be desired; it was essentially box with a lens on the front (not that we’re not used to seeing this form factor in many motion picture cameras nowadays!). Whilst the technology left most speechless with it’s potential, it was clear that the Lytro Light Field Camera would not be the plenoptic camera; we were looking at a mark 1 here.

The Lytro Illum shows much more potential, for starters it actually looks like a camera. The lens carries the same specification as the previous, an equivalent 30-250mm with a constant aperture of f/2.0. This time however we find a 1″ sensor hiding behind the glass; a much more desirable platform for photography than a sensor size similar to that of a smartphone (the previous Lytro camera had a 1/3″ sensor).

Lytro Illum

We also have a 4″ articulating touchscreen LCD, with a resolution of 800×480. If plenoptic cameras were measured in megapixels, it would output around 5 megapixels. But in light field terms it produces 40 megarays of angular resolution, nearly 4 times that of its predecessor.

The Illum shoots to SD cards, supports USB 3.0, and is constructed with a magnesium alloy body; it will carry a price tag of around $1500.

Never seen what a light field camera can do? Just check out this example

Still new technology in the consumer field, and perhaps still years away from any link with motion picture. But this is amazing technology.  It can truly change the way you view images online. It offers a new form of interaction, creates another dimension.

I can see this working great with product imagery. But in the filmmaking world, it will be relevant where ever critical focus is in play. Imagine filming a tele focal tracking shot, and applying the focus in post so that it’s 100% spot on. Or even utilizing it in a completely different manner; allowing the audience to shift the focal plane whilst watching your film to unlock a new dimension to your plot, adding depth to your story.

All credit is given to author cinema5DTim Fok

I’ve been talking about GPU upgrades so I thought I’d post some rendering tests I did awhile back on the GTX 670 and the GTX 285 with CS6. Adobe CS6 is a bit long in the tooth now that CC is out, but I still know a lot of people who use it. The specs on both of these systems are what I would consider middle and lower end respectively in todays market.

I used two timelines, the first I’ll call the “Easy timeline” which is comprised of a 2 minute and 42 second clip with a few audio tracks, a few video tracks,  no major effects, simple transitions, and a few color corrections made. This would represent a basic film, cut, and edit type of situation. The second test timeline I’ll call the “Complex timeline” which is composed of a 2 minute and 36 second clip with 3 audio tracks, 14 video tracks, complex nested sequences, AE timelines, and dozens of effects. This would represent a music video, composting, or a motion graphics situation.

Here are the specs on the two test computers:

Desktop editing system one:

Desktop editing system two:

Number one will set you back around $700 or so used on ebay depending on your motherboard, power supply, and case selection, while number two will set you back around $350 to $400 used depending on the same factors.

Note: Some of the parts are old enough on these systems that you would most likely have to find them used, that includes the GPUs.

For each test I exported the clip using Adobe’s standard Mpeg2 1080p 29.97 preset and timed the render process with and without the Mercury Playback engine GPU acceleration. Above is the Easy timeline with a total length of 162 seconds.

Editing system one: without MPE GPU acceleration enabled, it was able to render the Easy timeline in 133 seconds, with MPE GPU acceleration enabled the Easy timeline rendered in 117 seconds. Even without GPU acceleration, system one was able to render at 21% faster than real time playback, with GPU acceleration that number Jumps up to 38% faster than real time playback.

Editing system two: without MPE GPU acceleration enabled, it was able to render the Easy timeline in 155 seconds, with MPE GPU acceleration enabled the easy timeline rendered in 141 seconds. Without any GPU acceleration it was able to render 4.5% faster than real time, with acceleration it was able to render at 15% faster than real time.

Add the GPU acceleration to the mix and there is a noticeable jump in rendering speeds.  If most of your work is simple editing with few complex effects and your average timeline isn’t longer than 15 minutes, you probably won’t need the extra boost in rendering speed. The GTX 670 definitely provides an advantage over the GTX 285, but you’ll have to decide for yourself if it’s worth it to spend an extra $150 on the 670 upgrade. You could render that 20 minutes timeline in 12 minutes (GTX 670), 17 minutes (GTX 285) or 20 minutes with a low end graphics card.

I used the same render settings on Complex timeline (Mpeg2 1080p 29.97) as I did on the Easy timeline and timed the render process in the same manner. The Complex timeline (above) has a total length of 156 seconds.

Editing system one: without MPE GPU acceleration enabled, it was able to render the Complex timeline in 27 minutes 46 seconds (1666 seconds), with MPE GPU acceleration enabled the Complex timeline rendered in 9 minutes and 55 seconds (595 seconds). That’s a very impressive jump in rendering speed and really shows how much heavy lifting the GPU can do.

Editing system two: without MPE GPU acceleration enabled, it was able to render the Complex timeline in 38 minutes 45 seconds (2325 seconds), with MPE GPU acceleration enabled the Complex timeline rendered in 11 minutes 34 seconds (705 seconds). That’s still a very nice improvement to render speeds over the base system.

This test really shows how much the MPE GPU acceleration can do for render speeds even on a lower end system. However, I was less impressed with the 18% speed difference between the GTX 670 and the GTX 285 rendering the Complex timeline. The 670 wins the battle for speed but loses the battle for value. You can buy a used GTX 285 for around $60 v.s. the GTX 670 at around $230 used, is an 18% speed gain worth the price difference?

That’s not quite the end of the battle though. Timeline playback is also a very important issue to address. I can set Timeline playback on the GTX 670 to 100% quality without any playback issues on the Easy timeline, and 50% quality on the complex timeline and still get real time playback.

The GTX 285 stutters a bit on the Easy timeline at 100% quality, and plays smooth at %50. On the complex timeline, even at the lowest quality settings, playback is choppy after about 30 to 40 seconds. Pre-rendering effects in the timeline was really the only way to get smooth playback on the GTX 285 running the Complex timeline.

Conclusion

Although the GTX 670 does provide a noticeable rendering speed increase, it’s biggest value for me is real time playback. With the MPE GPU acceleration enabled most GTX cards (1GB and above) will provide a good boost to rendering speeds. If you’re work doesn’t require much more than 3 or 4 video tracks and some basic editing, the best value is going to be one of the lower priced cards like the GTX 285. On the other hand, if you use a lot of motion graphics, multi-cam, and AE projects in your timeline, spending the extra money on something like the GTX 670 or newer is definitely worth consideration.

The post How much does a GPU really affect your Adobe Premiere workflow? appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film Noobdeejay scharton

If you’ve been looking for a solid slider, but haven’t pulled the trigger on one, now is your chance to get on on the cheap. The guys behind White Dot have developed a pretty impressive Kickstarter Slider and you can get one for $175! Check out the video and visit the Kickstarter page to learn more.

Whitedot_SatelliteSlider_Complete

Features

  • 3 stroke lengths: 12, 24 and 36 inch
  • Silky smooth machined track
  • Light weight aluminum construction
  • Built to last
  • Configurable with many accessories
  • Quick attach/detach snap-on leg kit
  • Four different leg types to choose from
  • Cheese plate for mounting gear that can be positioned anywhere along the slider’s length
  • Belt drive system with available crank handwheel
  • Integrated drag control clutch option
  • 75mm hi-hat
  • Upgradeable to motorized control (future development, not part of this Kickstarter campaign)

Photos

Carriage Deck QC - Expanded Plate Clipping Leg 1 Clutch Handwheel

The post $175 Kickstarter Slider appeared first on DSLR Video Shooter.

All credit is given to author DSLR Video ShooterCaleb Pike

If you’ve been looking for a solid slider, but haven’t pulled the trigger on one, now is your chance to get on on the cheap. The guys behind White Dot have developed a pretty impressive Kickstarter Slider and you can get one for $175! Check out the video and visit the Kickstarter page to learn more.

dslr-slider

Features

  • 3 stroke lengths: 12, 24 and 36 inch
  • Silky smooth machined track
  • Light weight aluminum construction
  • Built to last
  • Configurable with many accessories
  • Quick attach/detach snap-on leg kit
  • Four different leg types to choose from
  • Cheese plate for mounting gear that can be positioned anywhere along the slider’s length
  • Belt drive system with available crank handwheel
  • Integrated drag control clutch option
  • 75mm hi-hat
  • Upgradeable to motorized control (future development, not part of this Kickstarter campaign)

Photos

Carriage Deck QC - Expanded Plate Clipping Leg 1 Clutch Handwheel

The post $175 Kickstarter Slider appeared first on DSLR Video Shooter.

All credit is given to author DSLR Video ShooterCaleb Pike

NAB Show 2014, Rodney from Dracast gives us an early look at a more affordable and durable new LED light fixture designed to replace popular CFL Lighting fixtures still used in photo/video today.

The Dracast T1000 (pending name) uses dimmable strips of LEDs within the tubing and is available in both single color Daylight or adjustable Bi-Color tungsten-daylight. Additionally you can purchase the Bi-Color Fixture and replace the tubes with single color for greater light output. Definitely a solid alternative to more expensive KinoFlo type lighting that many of us still have to rent, and easier to transport without dealing with fragile CFL lamps.

Dracast LED CFL Light Bank Video Lighting Bi-Color Single Daylight
Dracast Dimmable Bi-Color 3/6 LED Tube Light Bank Video Lighting

The video shows a 3 LED Light Bank 2ft. model, but according to Dracast they are also making these new lights available in 3/6 LED Light Banks in 2 ft. fixtures, 3/6 LED Light banks in 4 ft. fixtures, and 3/6 LED Light Banks in 6 ft. fixtures.

Compared to the high end True Match® CFL lamps used in similar fixtures, replacement Dracast High CRI LED Tubes will be half the price. More information about the T1000 LED Light Banks will be available at Dracast website (click here).

Dracast NAB 2014 LED Video Lighting CFL Light Bank Killer
Dracast Dimmable Bi-Color 3/6 LED Tube Light Bank Video Lighting

All credit is given to author CheesyCamEmm

This guide is for people looking to modify their lenses to work well for video and film use.

cinema-lens

Introduction

Before we get started here are some things your might want to know.

How Much Does This Cost?

I got these three lenses online for $200 (Olympus OM 35-70 F4, 75-150 F4 and 50mm F1.8). The accessories I used to mod them cost $231:

  • 3x $15 OM to Canon adapters
  • 3x $40 Cinevate lens gears
  • 3x $16 80mm Adapters
  • 3x $1 80mm Caps
  • 3x step up rings (around $5)
  • TOTAL: $231

So for $431 I have three killer little lenses for video.

Which Lenses Are Best To Use For This Mod?

The lenses I’m using in this video are great cheap lenses, but they’re hardly the best choice for cinema use. Mainly because the two zooms move in and out and their front filter ring moves. But you can’t beat the price.
Primes are much easier and better to use in general so Zeiss, Leica R or other more affordable primes work great.
As for zooms, the Nikon AF-S lenses like the 17-35 F2.8, the 28-70mm F2.8 and the 80-200mm F2.8 are all great for this mod.

Can A Professional Do This For Me?

You bet. I’d be terrified of altering the aperture on a $2000 lens so I’d send my lenses to Duclos to have those lens masters take care of my glass. Their Cine Mod costs $60-$250 which isn’t bad at all given the quality of parts and work they offer.

The Cinema Lens Guide

Here is a step by step guide to converting your stills lenses to a cinema lens set.

Step 1: Convert the Lens Mount

manual-lens-adapter

The first thing you obviously have to do is to get some lenses. In this video I used Olympus OM lenses and adapted them to Canon. But there are loads of other brands you could use. Check out my guide on manual lenses to find the right set for you. On that page you’ll be able to find the right adapter for your camera.

Step 2: Declick the Aperture Ring

de-click

You can do this yourself by searching Youtube for a tutorial on the lens you have or you can have it professionally done by the lens masters at Duclos for $60/lens. I’ll have some videos on declicking OM lenses soon.

Step 3: Lens Gears

cinema-lens-gears

The next step is adding 0.8 pitch cinema lens gears to your lenses. There are several different brands you can use but my favorites are the Cinevate gears and the Half Inch Rails Fat Gear.

Step 4: Cordvision 80mm Cine Rings

80mm cine ring

When it comes to using cine gear (like matte boxes matte box filters) with photo gear (DSLR lenses, setup up rings etc) there is a problem. Cinema lenses and adapters have 3 standard filter thread sizes: 80mm, 95mm and 114mm. Where as photo lenses and setup ups have completely different sizes (77mm, 82mm etc). This causes some problems. For example, you can take a matte box and clamp in right onto a cinema lens and still use the lens filter thread. Super cool. But you can’t do that with a photo lens or even the Rokinon Cine primes. I can’t afford cinema glass, so I did some research and found Cordvision’s 80mm Cine rings. These rings will adapter your smaller 52-77mm lenses to a cinema friendly 80mm outer diameter lens ring. Now not only will your matte box attach direction to your lens, but you also still get to use the 77mm filter thread on the lens! Your other option is to get the 80mm Ring from Duclos.

I know that was a lot of information, but trust me, its a big deal. Check out this video for more info on the 77-80mm rings.

Step 5: Push on Caps

80mm-push-on-caps

Final step is to add 80mm caps. You can get really 80mm push on cine caps from Duclos for $25 or you can get the cheap 80mm push on caps I mentioned in the video for $1.

Other Gear Mentioned

  • Genus 80mm Clamp on Adapter – This adapter allows you to clamp the matte box directly onto the lens for a perfect fit. My lenses all have an outer diameter of 80mm (thanks to the adapter we looked at earlier) so now I’m gold.
  • Genus Matte Box Lite Kit – This is the Matte box I used in this video.
  • Xume Adapters – Killer magnet filter holders.

Conclusion

So there you have it, a couple tips for cine modding your stills lenses. Let me know what you guys think and share your own tips with us!

 

The post Turn Your Photo Lenses Into a Cinema Lens Set appeared first on DSLR Video Shooter.

All credit is given to author DSLR Video ShooterCaleb Pike

NAB 2014, Brian shares more information on the latest Induro 75mm Hi Hat and Benro S8 Video Fluid Head that now offers variable drag on both Pan and Tilt for more control over your fluid head when you want the movement to operate very loose to very firm.

The Induro Hi Hat comes with a 75mm Half Bowl adapter which allows you to use any standard flat base Fluid Head. Of course if you are already using a 75mm half bowl head (such as the Benro S8), you can mount this directly to the Induro Hi Hat tripod.

I’ve been using the 100mm Induro Hi Hat for over a year, (see it in this video) and it’s been one of my favorite tools when working with products over tables, but for me personally this new 75mm version at half the weight is probably more suitable. As mentioned in the video, there is currently a rebate on this item found over at B&H (click here).

Induro Hi Hat Tripod
find-price-button Induro DR Hi-Hat Tripod Set (75mm Bowl)

The Benro S8 Pro Video Fluid Head is also currently offered with a rebate bringing the price down to just $199 (found here).

Benro S8 Fluid Drag Video Head

That’s a competitive price for a video fluid head which can support over 17 pounds (great for supporting sliders), has a built in counter balance, offers Variable Drag on both Pan & Tilt – and yes still compatible with your common Manfrotto 501PL plates. Find this rebate offer via B&H (click here)

Benro S8 Video Fluid Head Pan Tilt Variable Drag Benro S8 Video Fluid Head Tripod rebate Benro S8 Fluid Head manfrotto compatible
find-price-button Benro S8 Pro Video Fluid Head and Tripod Kits

NAB 2014 Coverage Sponsors

Camera Motion Research Came_80x80banner Varavon fvlighting

All credit is given to author CheesyCamEmm

R9 290x

Adobe started officially supporting the Radeon R9 290 series graphics cards in december and the original list prices for these GPU’s looked pretty nice at $399 for the R9 290 and $549 for the R9 290x. In most tests the R9 290 and R9 290x performs with in about 5% of the GTX 780 at $499 and GTX 780 ti at $699. If the MSRP of the R9 290 cards would have been consistent, the $100 to $150 in savings would have made the Radeon cards very attractive.

Unfortunately there have been two issues plaguing these GPUs. First, up until a few weeks ago virtual currency mining was driving the R9 290 series card prices up as high as $800 to $900 a piece, making the GTX 780 and 780 ti much more attractive for both video editing and gaming. Second, the stock Radeon design for these cards only provided a single, very loud cooling fan.

Thankfully both of these problems are starting to fade away. Virtual currency prices have dropped down low enough that they no longer seem to be effecting Radeon GPU prices. Also brands like Sapphire (Tri-X above) and ASUS have started to release cards with much quieter and more efficient custom cooling shrouds that keep noise levels and operating temperatures down.

R9 290 package

Where things start to get interesting is that as the virtual currency prices fall a lot of people are beginning to unload large amounts of R9 290 and R9 290x cards on to ebay. This has been driving the used prices of these cards down by an extra $100 to $150 on ebay while the GTX Titan, GTX 780, and GTX 780 ti prices stay about the same. If the prices of a Nvidia 780 ti and Radeon R9 290x is the same, i’d say go with an Nvidia card but if you can save a few hundred dollars for 5% less performance and higher operating temperatures, the Radeon cards start to look like a pretty good value.

I ended up winning a Sapphire R9 290x Tri-X card for $380 on ebay yesterday while I was in the doctors office waiting room which is what actually got me started looking at current GPU prices. I was very impressed with the 4k Radeon Adobe CC editing demos and rendering tests I say at NAB this year. They were getting great playback and rendering at 4k on a 4k timeline with nothing more than a R9 290x and a i7 4770. Plus the $319 price savings over a GTX 780 ti is money I can spend on a nice monitor upgrade.

In my two editing bays I currently run a GTX 680 and a Radeon HD 7970. After the updates that were released by Adobe at the end of last year, it seems like both of these cards have been keeping up with editing tasks quite nicely. Each card supports a few different effects in my timeline, but it seems like there is a lot of overlap right now between OpenCL and CUDA support in Adobe CC. Both seem to be helpful in both rendering and real time playback, especially when the layer count gets above 5.

The post Radeon R9 290x GPU prices fall, best value card for Adobe CC? appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film Noobdeejay scharton