Sony a7s Smallrig build (1 of 7)

I’ve been looking for a small mounting frame for the Sony a7s and a few of you recommended I check out Smallrig’s offering. Smallrig sells a lot of bits and pieces so it can be a little confusing when you are trying to figure out what parts you need/want for a rig. It took me a little time trying to visualize the layout I was looking for on the Sony a7s and this is what I came up with:

Sony a7s Smallrig build (2 of 7)

The handle I selected has a vertical Nato clamp instead of a horizontal Nato clamp and includes a cold shoe adapter. Most of Smallrig’s handles have horizontal Nato clamps. I’m guessing this is because they were intended to slide across the top of the camera in order to balance things out, but I wanted to use the handle in a slightly different manner.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (3 of 7)
I was also looking for a compact monitor mounting option and the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount seemed like a decent solution. While it is intended for an EVF, it’s also perfect for a small 5 inch monitor.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (4 of 7)

For those of you not familiar with Nato rails, they’re simply a plate with ridges on either side that allow you to clamp on extra gear. These rails were originally developed as a method for gun mounting flashlights and scopes, but companies like Smallrig and Wooden Camera have started to use them on camera rigs.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (6 of 7)

I used the Nato rails on the top and side of the sony cage. In one configuration I can hold the Sony a7s hand grip in my right hand and the handle in my left hand for an easy two handed minimalist rig.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (7 of 7)

Slide the handle off the side and move it to the top of the unit, then slide on the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount and you have a nice setup for a slider or tripod. Strip the handle and EVF mount off and you are basically back to the form factor of the Sony a7s with a few extra mounting options.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (5 of 7)

Overall i’m pretty impressed with Smallrig’s system. All the parts and pieces set me back about $165 plus shipping which is a little pricy for a minimalist rig but far less than Wooden Camera’s small dslr cage system.

If I were to place this order again I think I would trade out the Nato rails I picked for the Smallrig 1409 rail or Smallrig quick release Nato rail. While the 1437 Smallrig Nato rail I choose works well on the side of the unit, I was only really able to get two of the three screws in on the top of the unit. I don’t think it’s a problem, but if you are looking to duplicate my setup, those two options are worth looking into.

I’ll post a review video on this when I get some more time this weekend. It’s not quite perfect yet, but i’m still pretty happy with how it turned out.

The post Smallrig Sony a7s custom camera cage appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Sony a7s Smallrig build (1 of 7)

I’ve been looking for a small mounting frame for the Sony a7s and a few of you recommended I check out Smallrig’s offering. Smallrig sells a lot of bits and pieces so it can be a little confusing when you are trying to figure out what parts you need/want for a rig. It took me a little time trying to visualize the layout I was looking for on the Sony a7s and this is what I came up with:

Sony a7s Smallrig build (2 of 7)

The handle I selected has a vertical Nato clamp instead of a horizontal Nato clamp and includes a cold shoe adapter. Most of Smallrig’s handles have horizontal Nato clamps. I’m guessing this is because they were intended to slide across the top of the camera in order to balance things out, but I wanted to use the handle in a slightly different manner.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (3 of 7)
I was also looking for a compact monitor mounting option and the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount seemed like a decent solution. While it is intended for an EVF, it’s also perfect for a small 5 inch monitor.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (4 of 7)

For those of you not familiar with Nato rails, they’re simply a plate with ridges on either side that allow you to clamp on extra gear. These rails were originally developed as a method for gun mounting flashlights and scopes, but companies like Smallrig and Wooden Camera have started to use them on camera rigs.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (6 of 7)

I used the Nato rails on the top and side of the sony cage. In one configuration I can hold the Sony a7s hand grip in my right hand and the handle in my left hand for an easy two handed minimalist rig.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (7 of 7)

Slide the handle off the side and move it to the top of the unit, then slide on the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount and you have a nice setup for a slider or tripod. Strip the handle and EVF mount off and you are basically back to the form factor of the Sony a7s with a few extra mounting options.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (5 of 7)

Overall i’m pretty impressed with Smallrig’s system. All the parts and pieces set me back about $165 plus shipping which is a little pricy for a minimalist rig but far less than Wooden Camera’s small dslr cage system.

If I were to place this order again I think I would trade out the Nato rails I picked for the Smallrig 1409 rail or Smallrig quick release Nato rail. While the 1437 Smallrig Nato rail I choose works well on the side of the unit, I was only really able to get two of the three screws in on the top of the unit. I don’t think it’s a problem, but if you are looking to duplicate my setup, those two options are worth looking into.

I’ll post a review video on this when I get some more time this weekend. It’s not quite perfect yet, but i’m still pretty happy with how it turned out.

The post Smallrig Sony a7s custom camera cage appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Dan Chung our friend and colleague from newsshooter.com recently published a fascinating interview with Alan Roberts. We can best describe Alan as UK’s most respected camera tester who spent his career at the BBC evaluating and creating standards.
Since his retirement from the BBC he has continued to test independently and you may well have come across one of his white papers while researching your camera purchase.

Alan’s thoughts regarding “how to test and evaluate LED lights” go hand in hand with what we keep hearing from some LED manufacturers who are concerned that industry rivals are misleading their customers by indicating CRI (Colour Rendering Index) values as the most important “light accuracy” factor, while in practice, this old “measuring standard” is actually borrowed from the architectural world when measuring lights for offices, shops and factories is required…

Based on a research done by BBC colleagues, Alan has created a new way to test lights and compare them scientifically bringing a better way to evaluate different light sources. The solution is the TLCI (Television Lighting Consistency Index) which, although not an approved international standard, is recommended by the EBU and is finding success among manufacturers.

The TLCI takes a measurement of the spectral power distribution of a luminaire, using a spectroradiometer. It then analyses the performance of the luminaire in the context of television. It awards a single number value to the luminaire, on a scale from 0 to 100. The significance of the numbering is the same as the CRI, but with important differences. Unlike the CRI, where a score of greater than 90 is widely regarded as the minimum for television use, the TLCI-2012 scores are more spread out:

85 to 100 – errors are so small that a colourist would not consider correcting them

75 to 85 – a colourist would probably want to correct the colour performance, but could easily get an acceptable result

50 to 75 – a colourist would certainly want to correct the errors, and could probably achieve an acceptable result, but it would take significant time to get there

25 to 50 – the colour rendering is poor, and a good colourist would needed to improve it, but the results would not be up to broadcast standard

0 to 25 – the colour rendering is bad, and a colourist would struggle for a long time to improve it, and even then the results may not be acceptable for broadcast

All of Alan’s test results are published in the guild of television cameramen site and can be dowloaded from here. In order to help you understand the categories on the list, here is a short description made by Alan:

CCT – (correlated colour temperature)
d-(distance), If values are grater then 1, lights results are not particularity reliable.
Qa- That’s the TLCI score. The higher the number, better the light.

It is striking to see how poorly some leading manufacturers like Gekko, Manfrotto and Litepanels with their 1×1 panels did. On the other hand, Litepanels Astra and a relatively young company by the name “Fiilex” with their  Fiilex 100 did extremely well!

Head to newsshooter.com for the full interview Dan did with Alan

The post Are Our Lights Worse Than We Thought? LED Light Accuracy And The TLCI appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author cinema5D » NewsJohnnie Behiri

Dan Chung our friend and colleague from newsshooter.com recently published a fascinating interview with Alan Roberts. We can best describe Alan as UK’s most respected camera tester who spent his career at the BBC evaluating and creating standards.
Since his retirement from the BBC he has continued to test independently and you may well have come across one of his white papers while researching your camera purchase.

Alan’s thoughts regarding “how to test and evaluate LED lights” go hand in hand with what we keep hearing from some LED manufacturers who are concerned that industry rivals are misleading their customers by indicating CRI (Colour Rendering Index) values as the most important “light accuracy” factor, while in practice, this old “measuring standard” is actually borrowed from the architectural world when measuring lights for offices, shops and factories is required…

Based on a research done by BBC colleagues, Alan has created a new way to test lights and compare them scientifically bringing a better way to evaluate different light sources. The solution is the TLCI (Television Lighting Consistency Index) which, although not an approved international standard, is recommended by the EBU and is finding success among manufacturers.

The TLCI takes a measurement of the spectral power distribution of a luminaire, using a spectroradiometer. It then analyses the performance of the luminaire in the context of television. It awards a single number value to the luminaire, on a scale from 0 to 100. The significance of the numbering is the same as the CRI, but with important differences. Unlike the CRI, where a score of greater than 90 is widely regarded as the minimum for television use, the TLCI-2012 scores are more spread out:

85 to 100 – errors are so small that a colourist would not consider correcting them

75 to 85 – a colourist would probably want to correct the colour performance, but could easily get an acceptable result

50 to 75 – a colourist would certainly want to correct the errors, and could probably achieve an acceptable result, but it would take significant time to get there

25 to 50 – the colour rendering is poor, and a good colourist would needed to improve it, but the results would not be up to broadcast standard

0 to 25 – the colour rendering is bad, and a colourist would struggle for a long time to improve it, and even then the results may not be acceptable for broadcast

All of Alan’s test results are published in the guild of television cameramen site and can be dowloaded from here. In order to help you understand the categories on the list, here is a short description made by Alan:

CCT – (correlated colour temperature)
d-(distance), If values are grater then 1, lights results are not particularity reliable.
Qa- That’s the TLCI score. The higher the number, better the light.

It is striking to see how poorly some leading manufacturers like Gekko, Manfrotto and Litepanels with their 1×1 panels did. On the other hand, Litepanels Astra and a relatively young company by the name “Fiilex” with their  Fiilex 100 did extremely well!

Head to newsshooter.com for the full interview Dan did with Alan

The post Are Our Lights Worse Than We Thought? LED Light Accuracy And The TLCI appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author cinema5D » NewsJohnnie Behiri

Comment on this article at the EOSHD Forum

e-m5-ii-vs-e-m1

With the Olympus E-M5 Mark II we’ve been seduced.

40MP stills – oooh! High bitrate 24p – Ahh!

The E-M5 II is a great camera. Let’s see how they’ve ruined it.

The handling is lovely and the design is a thing of beauty. If Apple designed a camera it might have a close resemblance. Clean lines, clear layout, seemingly cut by lasers from a glistening silver block of metal. It probably isn’t but you get the picture. Build quality is a HUGE step up from the old E-M5, even in some ways from the E-M1. The main screen is very sharp and convincing to focus with manually. We have peaking, much improved codec and of course the next generation of Olympus’s 5 axis stabilisation, the undoubted star of the show here whether you’re interested in stills or video. What other camera can I shoot at a shutter speed of 1/2 in dim light at ISO 200 handheld and get a pin sharp shot?

The High Resolution mode delivering 40MP stills is extraordinary for stills, and by stills I mean still! The subject and camera have to be still for it to work but boy does it work. Utterly staggering image quality can be had from this mode.

e-m5-ii-40mp

The camera is fast to focus, fast to respond, small and robust, gorgeous and feature packed.

Then for a filmmaker it all comes collapsing down like a house of cards. Not only is video quality downright amateurish by 2015 standards, it’s worse than the E-M1. It’s softer and suffers from much more severe moire & aliasing.

e-m5-ii-moire-mess

This is true of all the available frame rates with any codec setting no matter what quality setting. If you were expecting GH3 1080p quality or heaven forbid even GH2 quality out of this 2015 camera for $1099 you will be in for a stomach churning moment of disappointment. It’s a kick in the teeth for us, given the clamour from video shooters clearly was enough for Olympus to make a leap with the codec and frame rates. Even timecode is on there! But worse video quality than the year old E-M1 is simply not acceptable, especially when that camera itself was only just about good enough (by early 2014 standards before the GH4).

That’s not to say a skilled operator can’t get the most out of it, as John Brawley’s early video showed. Plenty of shallow depth of field close ups at fast apertures or at longer focal lengths do help. But with video quality this mediocre bordering on crap, Olympus may as well get a good 10-20% of their sales and throw them straight in the bin. Those with any interest in video who have the E-M1 will have to skip it however much they want 24p and the better codec. Tell me how that makes sense…

This is ultra silly. Sillier than a weasel riding a woodpecker.

e-m5-mark-ii-back

I had realistic expectations. I didn’t expect it to have 4K – although given Panasonic have 4K across their range and as low as $799 on the LX100 and the E-M1 likely shared the same 4K capable sensor as the GH4, it’s not unreasonable to suggest they might have tried a bit harder in that direction too. It’s not unreasonable to suggest that with consumers now being able to buy 50″ 4K TVs for 500 euros, they might want a 4K camera to go with it and to create 4K content. Samsung NX1 – now there’s a threat to this camera for both stills and video. Samsung no less, with virtually zero photographic pedigree, out-witting Olympus?

Olympus have some very good people advising them and testing cameras. They put it in the hands of cinematographers before it was released. Every single one of these people should have told Olympus in no uncertain terms it just wasn’t good enough. If they’d put it in my hands before release I would have given them a red card and said DO NOT put it out in this state. Fix the moire, fix the aliasing, get it to GH3 standard class of 2013 then come back to me!

e-m5-mark-ii

Yes, yes it’s a consumer camera (albeit one with timecode and an ALL-I codec for professional editors!!) but it’s just one rung on the ladder under the flagship Olympus model. It’s also a year newer in technological terms.

Maybe putting cameras in the hands of pros shooting on Alexas with very little experience of mirrorless or consumer cameras is the problem. Maybe they have low expectations of image quality on this ultra cheap, ultra small cameras and have never shot on a Blackmagic or a GH4. I don’t know… but whatever the case, it looks like a mighty failire of feedback and the same “Vague Feedback” problem I highlighted in the FS7 review where advisors water down their criticism to maintain their achievement of popularity at the company.

The EVF is poor too. This doesn’t compete with various other mirrorless cameras in the same price region.

So now Olympus you leave me with a big dilemma. Do I sell my E-M1 or return the E-M5 Mark II to the store?

Why do I have to even choose? Why do I have to choose whether I want 24p OR higher quality 1080p? I should have both! Other cameras give me that and more, for cheaper!

If it wasn’t for the stabilisation I’d get rid of the pair of them quite frankly!

More on the E-M5 Mark II when I have stopped sobbing.

Comment on the forum

The post Olympus E-M5 Mark II – love and hate at first sight appeared first on EOSHD.

All credit is given to author EOSHDAndrew Reid (EOSHD)

Comment on this article at the EOSHD Forum

e-m5-ii-vs-e-m1

With the Olympus E-M5 Mark II we’ve been seduced.

40MP stills – oooh! High bitrate 24p – Ahh!

The E-M5 II is a great camera. Let’s see how they’ve ruined it.

The handling is lovely and the design is a thing of beauty. If Apple designed a camera it might have a close resemblance. Clean lines, clear layout, seemingly cut by lasers from a glistening silver block of metal. It probably isn’t but you get the picture. Build quality is a HUGE step up from the old E-M5, even in some ways from the E-M1. The main screen is very sharp and convincing to focus with manually. We have peaking, much improved codec and of course the next generation of Olympus’s 5 axis stabilisation, the undoubted star of the show here whether you’re interested in stills or video. What other camera can I shoot at a shutter speed of 1/2 in dim light at ISO 200 handheld and get a pin sharp shot?

The High Resolution mode delivering 40MP stills is extraordinary for stills, and by stills I mean still! The subject and camera have to be still for it to work but boy does it work. Utterly staggering image quality can be had from this mode.

e-m5-ii-40mp

The camera is fast to focus, fast to respond, small and robust, gorgeous and feature packed.

Then for a filmmaker it all comes collapsing down like a house of cards. Not only is video quality downright amateurish by 2015 standards, it’s worse than the E-M1. It’s softer and suffers from much more severe moire & aliasing.

e-m5-ii-moire-mess

This is true of all the available frame rates with any codec setting no matter what quality setting. If you were expecting GH3 1080p quality or heaven forbid even GH2 quality out of this 2015 camera for $1099 you will be in for a stomach churning moment of disappointment. It’s a kick in the teeth for us, given the clamour from video shooters clearly was enough for Olympus to make a leap with the codec and frame rates. Even timecode is on there! But worse video quality than the year old E-M1 is simply not acceptable, especially when that camera itself was only just about good enough (by early 2014 standards before the GH4).

That’s not to say a skilled operator can’t get the most out of it, as John Brawley’s early video showed. Plenty of shallow depth of field close ups at fast apertures or at longer focal lengths do help. But with video quality this mediocre bordering on crap, Olympus may as well get a good 10-20% of their sales and throw them straight in the bin. Those with any interest in video who have the E-M1 will have to skip it however much they want 24p and the better codec. Tell me how that makes sense…

This is ultra silly. Sillier than a weasel riding a woodpecker.

e-m5-mark-ii-back

I had realistic expectations. I didn’t expect it to have 4K – although given Panasonic have 4K across their range and as low as $799 on the LX100 and the E-M1 likely shared the same 4K capable sensor as the GH4, it’s not unreasonable to suggest they might have tried a bit harder in that direction too. It’s not unreasonable to suggest that with consumers now being able to buy 50″ 4K TVs for 500 euros, they might want a 4K camera to go with it and to create 4K content. Samsung NX1 – now there’s a threat to this camera for both stills and video. Samsung no less, with virtually zero photographic pedigree, out-witting Olympus?

Olympus have some very good people advising them and testing cameras. They put it in the hands of cinematographers before it was released. Every single one of these people should have told Olympus in no uncertain terms it just wasn’t good enough. If they’d put it in my hands before release I would have given them a red card and said DO NOT put it out in this state. Fix the moire, fix the aliasing, get it to GH3 standard class of 2013 then come back to me!

e-m5-mark-ii

Yes, yes it’s a consumer camera (albeit one with timecode and an ALL-I codec for professional editors!!) but it’s just one rung on the ladder under the flagship Olympus model. It’s also a year newer in technological terms.

Maybe putting cameras in the hands of pros shooting on Alexas with very little experience of mirrorless or consumer cameras is the problem. Maybe they have low expectations of image quality on this ultra cheap, ultra small cameras and have never shot on a Blackmagic or a GH4. I don’t know… but whatever the case, it looks like a mighty failire of feedback and the same “Vague Feedback” problem I highlighted in the FS7 review where advisors water down their criticism to maintain their achievement of popularity at the company.

The EVF is poor too. This doesn’t compete with various other mirrorless cameras in the same price region.

So now Olympus you leave me with a big dilemma. Do I sell my E-M1 or return the E-M5 Mark II to the store?

Why do I have to even choose? Why do I have to choose whether I want 24p OR higher quality 1080p? I should have both! Other cameras give me that and more, for cheaper!

If it wasn’t for the stabilisation I’d get rid of the pair of them quite frankly!

More on the E-M5 Mark II when I have stopped sobbing.

Comment on the forum

The post Olympus E-M5 Mark II – love and hate at first sight appeared first on EOSHD.

All credit is given to author EOSHDAndrew Reid (EOSHD)

While we’ve all been keeping our eyes on Chinese cinema camera manufacturer Kinefinity, cellphone maker Xiaomi have created waves with a $64 action camera that will make the execs at GoPro cry.

Xiaomi-action-cam-1

At the heart of the “Yi Action Camera” is Sony’s excellent Exmor R BSI CMOS image sensor powered by an Ambarella A7LS image processor. This is a 16 megapixel camera capable of 1080p60 recording to its built-in 64GB of memory, twice that of the entry level GoPro. At 72g it’s lighter than a GoPro yet has a slightly larger battery. It uses a Sony Exmor R CMOS sensor, which is truly unexpected from such an inexpensive device.

The Chinese contender does not come with all the mounts and accessories that make the GoPro so flexible and popular, but there are plans to have a “rich variety of accessories” for the camera available soon. With 40 meters underwater, the Xiamoi Yi is rated at identical waterproof depth as the GoPro. And also just like a GoPro, it can be controlled via a dedicated smartphone app, which also allows users to edit and share footage shot with the camera.

It seems Xiaomi have no immediate plans to release the camera outside of China, but it just goes to show that there is no room for complacency. One day you’re in, the next day a Chinese company has something better at half the price.

Xiaomi-action-cam-2

The post Xiaomi’s New Action Cam “Yi” – Better and Cheaper GoPro Alternative? appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author cinema5D » NewsRichard Lackey

Comment on this article at the EOSHD Forum

Click here to view the embedded video.

I was a contributing writer on this review (along with my footage) and I think it is spot on about the a7S as a video tool. DP Review are mainly a photography site but this is the best review of a video orientated hybrid camera they’ve yet done.

You can read my case for the camera at DPReview here!

If you missed all the coverage of the Sony a7S on EOSHD last year, the piece at DP Review offers a great chance to catch up and see a summary…

“I find the a7S has some great creative advantages over a number of other cameras, thanks to the 12MP full-frame sensor with stunning low light capabilities, adaptable mirrorless lens mount, and the built in EVF”

The camera landscape is rapidly shifting at the moment, but everything I said about the a7S still holds true. Mine has been a good investment so far, the images I’ve made with it will stay with me for a long time.

However I have a feeling the Panasonic GH4 could be making a resurgence if what I here about the next firmware update is true. A big resurgence!

It’s great to have so much choice at the moment for video, where Canon have singularly failed to deliver. Let’s hope that changes soon as I welcome as many manufacturers as possible to our little ‘niche’!

****

If you’re not yet ready for 4K, or don’t want the hassle of the workflow (on the 1D C, NX1 it is indeed a more longwinded process than with XAVC 1080p) the a7S is still the one to go for. It’s also a good way to learn how to grade LOG footage, since S-LOG2 is pretty challenging to get the best out of in post. Alternatively you can just put everything on ‘standard’ and still get some lovely images. My Shogun footage was shot this way, which you can see below.

Here’s what 120fps looks like on the a7S in low light. Shooting at these ISOs before at such high shutter speeds (1/240) has never before been doable. Usually slow-mo sequences have to be brightly lit, with a harsher look. The aim with this was to get a glowing, almost ghostly softness in the light. The original cut of this material was made for a pitch to the Radiohead drummer for his new solo music video.

And here is 4K on the Shogun. Here the camera stands toe-to-toe with the 1D C but you do need to factor into your shooting style that very large external monitor / recorder and the file sizes. If you’re comfortable shooting this way the results are simply stunning – it’s a very sharp image even for 4K and if you have an 85″ 4K TV (prices are dropping crazily) that’s where the magic really starts to happen. 50″ – nah, 65″ – getting warmer, 85″ – woah. You will not want to watch anything else once you’ve seen it that way. Huge TVs and 4K were made to be together.

Finally here’s a broad range of ProRes from the Shogun from a number of filmmakers including myself in the official Atomos show reel -

I won’t spoil DPR’s own conclusion about the camera so head over to DPReview here for the full piece, with the pros and cons. Big thanks to Richard and Dale for working with me on the review and the filmmaker’s perspective page.

Comment on the forum

The post DP Review Gold for Sony a7S – read my Filmmaker’s Perspective on page 8! appeared first on EOSHD.

All credit is given to author EOSHDAndrew Reid (EOSHD)

Comment on this article at the EOSHD Forum

Click here to view the embedded video.

I was a contributing writer on this review (along with my footage) and I think it is spot on about the a7S as a video tool. DP Review are mainly a photography site but this is the best review of a video orientated hybrid camera they’ve yet done.

You can read my case for the camera at DPReview here!

If you missed all the coverage of the Sony a7S on EOSHD last year, the piece at DP Review offers a great chance to catch up and see a summary…

“I find the a7S has some great creative advantages over a number of other cameras, thanks to the 12MP full-frame sensor with stunning low light capabilities, adaptable mirrorless lens mount, and the built in EVF”

The camera landscape is rapidly shifting at the moment, but everything I said about the a7S still holds true. Mine has been a good investment so far, the images I’ve made with it will stay with me for a long time.

However I have a feeling the Panasonic GH4 could be making a resurgence if what I here about the next firmware update is true. A big resurgence!

It’s great to have so much choice at the moment for video, where Canon have singularly failed to deliver. Let’s hope that changes soon as I welcome as many manufacturers as possible to our little ‘niche’!

****

If you’re not yet ready for 4K, or don’t want the hassle of the workflow (on the 1D C, NX1 it is indeed a more longwinded process than with XAVC 1080p) the a7S is still the one to go for. It’s also a good way to learn how to grade LOG footage, since S-LOG2 is pretty challenging to get the best out of in post. Alternatively you can just put everything on ‘standard’ and still get some lovely images. My Shogun footage was shot this way, which you can see below.

Here’s what 120fps looks like on the a7S in low light. Shooting at these ISOs before at such high shutter speeds (1/240) has never before been doable. Usually slow-mo sequences have to be brightly lit, with a harsher look. The aim with this was to get a glowing, almost ghostly softness in the light. The original cut of this material was made for a pitch to the Radiohead drummer for his new solo music video.

And here is 4K on the Shogun. Here the camera stands toe-to-toe with the 1D C but you do need to factor into your shooting style that very large external monitor / recorder and the file sizes. If you’re comfortable shooting this way the results are simply stunning – it’s a very sharp image even for 4K and if you have an 85″ 4K TV (prices are dropping crazily) that’s where the magic really starts to happen. 50″ – nah, 65″ – getting warmer, 85″ – woah. You will not want to watch anything else once you’ve seen it that way. Huge TVs and 4K were made to be together.

Finally here’s a broad range of ProRes from the Shogun from a number of filmmakers including myself in the official Atomos show reel -

I won’t spoil DPR’s own conclusion about the camera so head over to DPReview here for the full piece, with the pros and cons. Big thanks to Richard and Dale for working with me on the review and the filmmaker’s perspective page.

Comment on the forum

The post DP Review Gold for Sony a7S – read my Filmmaker’s Perspective on page 8! appeared first on EOSHD.

All credit is given to author EOSHDAndrew Reid (EOSHD)

Watch all other episodes of ON THE COUCH so far by clicking here!

cinema5D-ON-THE-COUCH-sponsor-logo-banner-IBC-Photokina-new

It’s always refreshing to see companies who compete in the same or similar markets sit peacefully together and talk to each other, rather than trying to make others look bad for their own gain. We have this beautiful example here with ZEISS, SLR Magic and Samyang, three VERY different manufacturers of lenses.

To be more exact, it’s Christophe Casenave from ZEISS, Andrew Chan from SLR Magic and Joost Wierenga for Samyang (from Disnet B.V. distributor).

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Among the new products they presented are (click the links for details about the products at B&H):

The ZEISS ZM 1.4 35mm for the M bajonette, the LOXIA 35mm & 50mm f/2.0 and the new OTUS 85mm f/1.4 from ZEISS.

SLR Magic started with lens adapters and moved into making budget cinema lenses. They recently introduced a 10mm T/2.1 Hyperprime Cine Lens, a 50mm T/2.1 Cine Prime with PL Mount for Full Frame as well as the SLR Magic Anamorphot 1.33X anamorphic adapter for lenses.

Samyang filled the gap in their prime lens lineup with the introduction of the Samyang 50mm f/1.4 prime lens in both cinema and photo versions. Also they introduced the 12mm f/2.8 fish eye lens.

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We talked about how their different product ranges – from the low to the top end – fit into the current market, in which everything is coming together. Cameras are getting cheaper and more accessible on one hand, and on the other there is still a growing demand for quality in an ever-evolving market.

It’s interesting to see in where different manufacturers see their different focuses, and in the next part of this episode we will dive deeper into the crystal ball of the lens industry and pick the brains of ZEISS, SLR Magic and Samyang for future developments and where our industry is headed.

The next part of this episode will be published in one week on March 10 right here on cinema5D. On Friday March 6 we will publish the first part of episode 22.

Watch all other episodes of ON THE COUCH so far by clicking here!

 

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The post ZEISS, SLR Magic, Samyang – lens competitors ON THE COUCH together! ep 21, part 1 (of 3) appeared first on cinema5D.

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