The following video is an example of how I choose to configure the different profiles available when using the Alexmos Basecam 32 Bit Gimbal Controller. This is not unique to the Tiyaga MIni Gimbal i’m using, as you can apply the same techniques to your CAMETV 32 Bit Gimbals or Varavon Birdycam Stabilizer.

With the Joystick installed, I can remain static and allow the gimbal to perform Pan or Tilt moves much like a tripod with a fluid head. Or I can enable ‘Follow Mode’ to which I control the Pitch and Tilt simply by maneuvering the handles. One profile allows me to disable follow mode completely so that I can track a subject straight on without drifting. I’m also able to calibrate the entire gimbal on location without the need of software by reserving Profile 4 & 5. My long press option is reserved for Inverting the Gimbal Frame which can be handy when I want to place the handles below the camera and when not using a monitor.

Here’s a rundown of the different profile settings i’m using.
Profile 1: Follow Mode ON Pitch + Yaw
Profile 2: Follow Mode ON Yaw | Pitch OFF
Profile 3: Follow Mode OFF Pitch + Yaw
Profile 4: Calibrate ACC (sensors)
Profile 5: Calibrate Gyros
Long Press: Invert Gimbal Frame

All credit is given to author CheesyCamEmm

For pictures on your feed, Twitter don’t appear to restrict us nearly as much as Facebook does, so posting a decent quality picture to a feed should be relatively easy, right? Well, it's trickier than you might think. This Quick Tip aims to get your JPEGs displayed in the best way possible.

Twitter Feed Pictures

Twitter has given us these guidelines:

twitter guidelines
Twitter's Guidelines

We’re focusing on JPEG in this Quick Tip so all examples are in that format. It would seem that with a 5MB limit we already have a lot more to play with than Facebook. But is that necessarily the case? A 5MB file might be compressed by Twitter down to the same as a 3MB or a 1MB file with varying states of distortion. So let’s find out!

example picture
Our example picture

I uploaded three versions of my above example to my Twitter Feed; a 3000px (4.2MB) file, a 2000px (2.2MB) file and a 1000px (734kb) file. This is how they came out:

pictures after twitter compression
Pictures after Twitter Compression

I saved each image which had been auto-resized to 600px by Twitter (you can only save the preview but I could screen capture the full-view version which you see above) and noticed that the file sizes were very interesting. 

The 3000px 4.2MB image had come out at 47.2kb, the 2000px 2.2MB at 47.5kb and the 1000px 734kb at 52.4kb.  So the larger of the images had actually gone down to the smallest size. Interesting when you look at the compression on each. The largest image has some compression artefacts but it’s also lost a lot of its sharpness across the whole image. The smallest is now the largest file size, but the compression is very pronounced around the outlines of the people. 

As in the case of Facebook, it seems that larger images fair better; but not too large. In my own experience, somewhere around 1500-2000px is about right and if you can lower the file size with Save For Web then all the better.

Header Photos

This is my example:

test header
Example header

Upload of a High Resolution Image

Firstly I tried this at very high resolution, 5000px wide and 8MB – the max Twitter will allow is 10MB.

large resolution twitter header
Large resolution Twitter header

That looked pretty good to me. It’s cropped in a little but as it was a hi-res image, that’s okay. You can see there’s very little visible compression here.

I was pretty smug, until I hit save:

after saving
The compression after saving was pretty bad

The compression happened after saving the good looking image. You can now see compression around the edges and an overall loss of sharpness

So what if we upload the same thing but after resizing to Twitter’s recommended 1500 x 500px?

Upload of Twitter's Recommended Size Image

Recommended size for twitter header
Twitter's recommended header size

It’s cropped in like the other did but the compression is nowhere near as bad. Here are the comparisons side by side:

comparisons at 100
Comparisons of a large size and Twitter's recommended size at 100%

You can see the loss of definition in both but the one on the left is far worse, with quite visible distortion, especially around the writing on the boat.

What If...

Twitter's guide's clearly worked better than a full size image but I wondered; what if I took their size, kept the same ratio but doubled the size. I created a 3000px by 1000px image and tried that:

Twitter header ratio doubled
I tried doubling Twitter's recommendation, 3000 x 1500px

Aha! This looks much better to me; there are still signs of compression but you can see from the 100% preview in the corner, the writing on the boat is much clearer and the edges of objects have far less visible artefacting.

Summary

Third party websites are always going to compress our images, we just have to find the best way possible of displaying them with these restrictions. Their guidelines are there for a reason but that's not to say having a play around won't get you better results.

Getting the best results for feed images

  • Upload a large(ish) size, ideally between 1500px-2000px
  • Save at maximum quality possible
  • Reduce the file size with Save For Web

Getting the best results for cover images.

  • 3000px by 1000px worked well for me
  • It must be under 10MB 
  • It will crop in but the results will be far better than resizing to the recommended 1500px by 500px

See Also

Facebook also compresses your images. Yesterday we looked at how to get the best results for your timeline.

All credit is given to author Tuts+ Photo & VideoMarie Gardiner

We’ve all done it, uploaded a picture that looked fantastic in our editing software only to recoil in horror at the compressed mess that now sits on our Facebook timeline. In this Quick Tip, I'll help you get the best quality result possible when uploading your pictures.

Deciphering the Guidelines

Facebook has given us these guidelines:

facebook guidelines
Facebook's guidelines on image uploading

So let’s see what works. We’ll start with regular images.

Regular Images on the Timeline

Facebook suggests we upload at either 720px, 960px or 2048px wide for the best results. This is the picture I’m going to be using for our comparison:

example picture
Example picture to use on Facebook

I saved the picture at each of the mentioned widths and uploaded them; then saved the Facebook-compressed versions back to my computer.

The first thing to note is the difference in file size. If I go through each one we’ll get lost in numbers, so to take the middle width; 960px, the file I started with was 523kb and the one I saved back from Facebook was 86.9kb so already we know there’s going to be drastic compression.

Here are all three sizes at 100% after Facebook:

facebook compression comparison
A comparison of the three suggested widths to use on Facebook

We can note artifacting on all three pictures, particularly around the top of the bridge so I’ve focused on that for demonstration purposes. The larger image (top left) has the least obvious signs of compression and most people wouldn’t be looking at it this closely so it would be even less noticeable, unlike the 720px which is as big as it’s ever going to get.

I tried the same file sizes with PNG instead of JPEG and got similar results, so I won’t bore you with them here.  It’s worth noting that PNG creates a larger file-size so Facebook is just going to want to cut that down (a bit more about this later). The only time I find this makes a real difference with timeline images is if they include text, like if you’re uploading something with a logo, for example.

Cover Photos

This is the photo I’m going to use for my cover:

example cover photo
My example cover photo

If I tried to upload this at the full resolution (some 7000px wide), this is what happens:

facebook cover with compression
Facebook cover with full resolution picture used

Not good at all. Facebook recommends firstly resizing to 851 x 315 so let’s try that:

facebook cover with resized photo
Facebook cover with resized photo but still over 100kb

Better, but still a lot of distortion around the puffin in particular. This picture is still almost 300kb though and Facebook recommends 100kb so this time, I used File > Save For Web (Control-Shift-Alt-S) and adjusted the Quality get the final image under 100kb:

save for web
Use Save For Web to get your image under 100kb
facebook cover under 100kb and resized
Cover at 851 x 135 and saved at under 100kb 

As you can see, this gets the best result yet. Sometimes I do find with cover photos that I can get a slightly better result using a PNG rather than a JPEG, but as I mentioned earlier, it’s harder to keep those file sizes down to below 100kb so try both and see which works for you.

Summary

Here are some points to remember:

Getting the Best Results for Timeline Images:

  • Upload a large size
  • Save at maximum quality
  • Use PNG for images with text (logos)

 Getting the Best Results for Cover Images:

  • Resize to 851 x 315
  • Use Save For Web and get down to below 100kb
  • Try JPEG and PNG to see which looks best

The images are never going to be completely without compression, not unless Facebook change how they do things, but we can get them to look much better with a little tweaking here and there.

All credit is given to author Tuts+ Photo & VideoMarie Gardiner

MSI GS60

There were a number of questions about the MSI GS60 upgrade I posted a few weeks ago. The number one question was “Will this void my warranty?” I’ve spoken to MSI on the phone and they said it would not, but I never got anything back from them via e-mail. Laura was kind enough to send me a link this morning to the FAQ answer above (you can find it here).

You are allowed to upgrade the internal components of your system without voiding your warranty as long as no damages are inflicted during the upgrade process (limited to US region only)

So there’s your answer, if you are interested and brave, you can find my upgrade guide here.

The post MSI GS60 upgrade doesn’t void your warranty appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

DSLR FILM NOOB Podcast Episode 4

New podcast logo 3 (1 of 1)

DSLR FILM NOOB podcast Episode 4 is up. This time planetMitch join’s me from planet5D to discuss the soon to be released Tamron 15-35mm f2.8, the discontinued Sigma 24-105 f4 lens, camera firmware updates, and more. You can find the show notes here. You can find the show on itunesSoundcloud, or under the podcast tab above. Video coming soon.

Pick’s of the day from planetMitch is Mobio for mac, Deejay’s pick is the Lenovo thinkpad 8 tablet.

The post DSLR FILM NOOB Podcast Episode 4 appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Comment on this article at the EOSHD Forum

On Sunday you will be able to buy a brand new Canon 1D C 4K DSLR for $7999 at Adorama. It is currently $12,000 and the price drop will be applied on the 1st February. I’m expecting others such as B&H in the US and CVP in the UK to follow suit as it’s an official Canon discount. This puts the internally [...]

The post Canon 1D C to get official $4000 price drop on Sunday 1st February appeared first on EOSHD.

All credit is given to author EOSHDAndrew Reid (EOSHD)

Screen Shot 2015-01-30 at 8.06.45 AM

Andrew Reid over at EOSHD got this leaked info about the new Canon 50MP 5Ds Full Frame Camera. Here is a rip from the EOSHD post.

Click here to check it out.

Specifications here. No info on video specs just yet. We will update as we get more info.

  • CMOS 50.6MP full frame sensor (by Canon or Sony?)
  • Dual DIGIC 6
  • Magnesium alloy body (weather proof)
  • ISO 100-6400 (regular)
  • Max 5fps continuous shooting
  • New picture styles including “fine detail”
  • Crop modes of 1.3x and 1.6x
  • New “quick control screen”
  • Built in Interval Timer
  • Built in timelapse
  • 64 AF points
  • EOS iTR AF
  • 150,000 pixel RGB + IR photometry sensor

All credit is given to author Wide Open CameraJared Abrams

Screen Shot 2015-01-30 at 8.06.45 AM

Andrew Reid over at EOSHD got this leaked info about the new Canon 50MP 5Ds Full Frame Camera. Here is a rip from the EOSHD post.

Click here to check it out.

Specifications here. No info on video specs just yet. We will update as we get more info.

  • CMOS 50.6MP full frame sensor (by Canon or Sony?)
  • Dual DIGIC 6
  • Magnesium alloy body (weather proof)
  • ISO 100-6400 (regular)
  • Max 5fps continuous shooting
  • New picture styles including “fine detail”
  • Crop modes of 1.3x and 1.6x
  • New “quick control screen”
  • Built in Interval Timer
  • Built in timelapse
  • 64 AF points
  • EOS iTR AF
  • 150,000 pixel RGB + IR photometry sensor

All credit is given to author Wide Open CameraJared Abrams

Gizmodo got an early version of the new GoPro Hero 4 firmware update adding 240 fps at 720 X 1280 resolution. The footage looks pretty good. The blacks don’t really crush. I’m much more excited for the 2.7K 60 fps update. I can’t wait to see what it will look like in the hands of some real shooters.

Click here to check out the full article.

 

All credit is given to author Wide Open CameraJared Abrams

Gizmodo got an early version of the new GoPro Hero 4 firmware update adding 240 fps at 720 X 1280 resolution. The footage looks pretty good. The blacks don’t really crush. I’m much more excited for the 2.7K 60 fps update. I can’t wait to see what it will look like in the hands of some real shooters.

Click here to check out the full article.

 

All credit is given to author Wide Open CameraJared Abrams