We’re happy to announce that today we’re launching a month-long collaboration with our friends from Filmstro, an initiative called “Music Month”. This 3-part video series aims to teach you about the relationship between Music and Film. If you haven’t heard of it, Filmstro is a brilliant piece of software that makes scoring for movies easy. Just this year we used it to score my rhino preservation documentary “Through the Thick” (watch here).

Watch the first episode of Music Month below!!

Film Scoring Competition

Please head over to Filmstro.com for details on how to enter the competition. Using the Filmstro app, you will be able to score one of 5 pieces of sample footage. The submissions will be reviewed by a jury and the best submissions will win the following prizes:

  • RØDE Boompole Pro, SM4-R, NTG4+ and Newsshooter Kit
  • Zhiyun-Tech Crane-M Camera Stabiliser Gimbal
  • Zacuto $650 Gift voucher
  • 10 FilmConvert licenses
  • 4 x $250 bundles from Mister Horse
  • 10 Filmstro For-Profit Licenses

All the details on the Filmstro page!

Music Month Episode 1 – Seeing Music

And now, without further ado, please join Seb Jaeger from Filmstro and I for the first episode of Music Month. We sit and analyse the fundamental building blocks of music: momentum, depth and power. Using example scenes from famous movies such as Harry Potter, Transformers, Star Wars and many more, we dissect how these building blocks work and how they interact.

Join us and enjoy!

In next week’s episode, we will put into practise what we learned today, and score footage using these three musical elements.

music-month-seb-nino

Seb Jaeger from Filmstro with Nino Leitner from cinema5D talking about musical scores of movies during Episode 1, “Seeing Music”.

The post Filmstro & cinema5D “Music Month” – Learn About Music for Film & Win Prizes appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DNino Leitner

We’re happy to announce that today we’re launching a month-long collaboration with our friends from Filmstro, an initiative called “Music Month”. This 3-part video series aims to teach you about the relationship between Music and Film. If you haven’t heard of it, Filmstro is a brilliant piece of software that makes scoring for movies easy. Just this year we used it to score my rhino preservation documentary “Through the Thick” (watch here).

Watch the first episode of Music Month below!!

Film Scoring Competition

Please head over to Filmstro.com for details on how to enter the competition. Using the Filmstro app, you will be able to score one of 5 pieces of sample footage. The submissions will be reviewed by a jury and the best submissions will win the following prizes:

  • RØDE Boompole Pro, SM4-R, NTG4+ and Newsshooter Kit
  • Zhiyun-Tech Crane-M Camera Stabiliser Gimbal
  • Zacuto $650 Gift voucher
  • 10 FilmConvert licenses
  • 4 x $250 bundles from Mister Horse
  • 10 Filmstro For-Profit Licenses

All the details on the Filmstro page!

Music Month Episode 1 – Seeing Music

And now, without further ado, please join Seb Jaeger from Filmstro and I for the first episode of Music Month. We sit and analyse the fundamental building blocks of music: momentum, depth and power. Using example scenes from famous movies such as Harry Potter, Transformers, Star Wars and many more, we dissect how these building blocks work and how they interact.

Join us and enjoy!

In next week’s episode, we will put into practise what we learned today, and score footage using these three musical elements.

music-month-seb-nino

Seb Jaeger from Filmstro with Nino Leitner from cinema5D talking about musical scores of movies during Episode 1, “Seeing Music”.

The post Filmstro & cinema5D “Music Month” – Learn About Music for Film & Win Prizes appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DNino Leitner

Final product image
What You'll Be Creating

Personalising the Christmas cards you send can be an extra special touch for family and friends, or a great marketing opportunity if you’re in business. Making your own might card might sound like a chore, but it’s easier than you think. Once you’ve got your template, you can update quickly and easily year after year.

Choosing Your Picture

Hopefully, you’ll have a bank of wintery, Christmassy or family themed shots. If not, now is the time to take one!

When you decide on your picture, think about the orientation your card will be and how the image will fill the space. Will there be enough empty space for your message? If you're shooting something new, think about the composition accordingly. Sky, water or snow can be particularly useful 'empty' spaces on which to place text.

What You'll Need

1. Create the Outside of the Card

Insert Your Image

Open the template and hide any layers you don't want to keep.

 

Insert your image as a Smart Object, place it appropriately, then create a layer mask to hide the half of the photo that would be over the back of the card.

create layer mask
Use a layer mask to hide the half of the image you won't use

Remember to leave room for your text.

2. Place Your Text

Install your font and add some text to the image, making sure that it stands out against the background.

add text
Add some text, making sure it stands out against the background

The font is supposed to represent snow, so it made sense for it to be quite. I added a drop shadow to help it pop against the pale sky.

3. Let There be Snow

Install your brushes and then create a new layer. Using a few brushes, for variety, create a a snow effect on top of your image. Make use of a layer mask again to leave the back of your card unaffected.

Use the rounded snow brushes for a softer effect and remember that usually, less is more.

4. Add Your Christmas Tree

Open up the Christmas tree image and drag it over into your current workspace. You'll see that it's broken down into a number of layers

 

Position the image in the middle at the back and then drag the bottom <Path> layer so that it covers the card. Hide the first <Group> Layer, you don’t need it.

christmas tree
Position your tree on the back of the card, at the centre

Next, using a soft brush at about 8% opacity, go back to your original image layer and brush over the layer mask to blend the tree.

 

5. Let There be (More) Snow

Create a new layer and using the same brushes as before, add more snow on the back of your card. 

add snow to back of card
Add more snow to the back of your card

You can just duplicate your other layer and drag it over if you don’t mind the snow being in the same position.

Go back to the template layer(s) and add some text to the back of your card. 

If you’re a professional photographer, this is a good place to pop your company name. If this is a card for friends and family, then think of something cute or funny to write here.

I’ve hidden the front verse and merry Christmas layers and written in my own message.

6. The Finished Outside

outside of the card
The outside of the card is finished

7. Create the Inside of the Card

Change the Colour and Text

Make the colour of the inside of the card a paler version of outside. Use the colour dropper to select an appropriate colour, create a new layer and fill it with that colour.

Change the text if desired. I've removed the verse and written my own message, then increased the font size to suit.

Add Interest to the Inside

Remove the ornaments if they're not to your taste and use the snow brushes to add some interest to the inside of your card. Remember to leave yourself room to write in your card.

Add the Christmas Tree Again

Drag in the Christmas tree again and hide each of the <group> and <path> layers until just the Christmas tree remains. 

Resize to suit and change the blend mode of the tree layer to lighten. This will blend it better with the colour of your background. If it doesn’t stand out enough, try adding a drop shadow.

8. The Finished Inside

inside the card
Inside the Christmas Card

 9. Print and Send

christmas card mock up
How the Christmas Card Looks

Making a card from one of your own images can be very satisfying, and it's a nice, personal touch for those who know you and what you do. Printing your own cards can become expensive, so you may want to limit yourself to a small number—which will make whoever receives one feel all the more special!

Initially, creating your card will take a little time and effort, but once you have your template, you can simply update the picture or refresh the text each year, which is a much faster process.

We hope you enjoy making your greetings card and that you have a great time over the holidays.


All credit is given to author Envato Tuts+ Photo & VideoMarie Gardiner

The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit is a new, third-party dual-lens system for the iPhone 7 Plus. It features a sleek and slim design that makes it unobtrusive and quick to use.

Smartphone filmmaking is certainly a thing these days. Modern smartphones feature decent cameras that can be used in conjunction with a variety of apps, stabilisers and other accessories to produce very high quality content. Just take a look at this short film shot simultaneously on an iPhone 7 and a RED Weapon for the kind of end result you can achieve. By the way, if you want to learn more about iPhone filmmaking, make sure you check out this excellent article by cinema5D’s Richard Lackey.

One of the limitations you may find on your journey as an iPhone cinematographer is your camera’s lens. Camera accessory manufacturer Kamerar has announced a product that promises to help you achieve more interesting images: it’s the Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit for the iPhone 7 Plus.

The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit

The main difference to other third-party lens options out there is how seamlessly it integrates with your iPhone 7 Plus. The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit is based around an actual functional protective phone cover with access to all ports, meaning that you don’t have to whip out lens mounts whenever inspiration strikes and you change from phone mode to shooting mode.

2_

The back of the case features a slot in which to insert the different dual-lens setups, allowing you to quickly flip up the optics when you want to change your field of view and optical characteristics. This removes the need to screw and unscrew different lenses, and helps you save time when trying to get that unexpected shot.

Kamerar claims their removable dual-lens system for the dual camera on the iPhone 7 Plus is the first in the world, and this does in fact seem to be the case, as other third-party offerings only appear to make use of one of the cameras.

4_

In terms of lens options, the Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit product announcement revealed two dual-lens setups designed by Ztylus Innovations – a Macro Zoom that allows you to focus very close to your subject for striking detail, and a Fisheye/Telephoto that expands the optical zoom capabilities of the dual cameras on the iPhone 7 Plus.

3_

Sure, you might not have such a huge selection of optics as with the OlloClip system, and the lenses may not have the ZEISS logo like on ExoLens Pro. But the low-profile that the Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit offers, as well as the ease of use that allows you to change optical characteristics with a quick flick of your fingertips could make this product a favourite among iPhone filmmakers. If the price is competitive and the image quality stands up to the rigorous eye of filmmakers out there, this could turn out to be a very interesting product indeed. In the meantime, check out the sample footage below!

There is no pricing or availability for the Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit yet, but we’ve reached out to them and will keep you posted.

Would you pimp your iPhone 7 Plus with something like this? Have you tried any of the alternatives? Let us know in the comments below!

The post The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit – a Removable Dual-Lens System for the iPhone 7 Plus appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DFabian Chaundy

The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit is a new, third-party dual-lens system for the iPhone 7 Plus. It features a sleek and slim design that makes it unobtrusive and quick to use.

Smartphone filmmaking is certainly a thing these days. Modern smartphones feature decent cameras that can be used in conjunction with a variety of apps, stabilisers and other accessories to produce very high quality content. Just take a look at this short film shot simultaneously on an iPhone 7 and a RED Weapon for the kind of end result you can achieve. By the way, if you want to learn more about iPhone filmmaking, make sure you check out this excellent article by cinema5D’s Richard Lackey.

One of the limitations you may find on your journey as an iPhone cinematographer is your camera’s lens. Camera accessory manufacturer Kamerar has announced a product that promises to help you achieve more interesting images: it’s the Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit for the iPhone 7 Plus.

The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit

The main difference to other third-party lens options out there is how seamlessly it integrates with your iPhone 7 Plus. The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit is based around an actual functional protective phone cover with access to all ports, meaning that you don’t have to whip out lens mounts whenever inspiration strikes and you change from phone mode to shooting mode.

2_

The back of the case features a slot in which to insert the different dual-lens setups, allowing you to quickly flip up the optics when you want to change your field of view and optical characteristics. This removes the need to screw and unscrew different lenses, and helps you save time when trying to get that unexpected shot.

Kamerar claims their removable dual-lens system for the dual camera on the iPhone 7 Plus is the first in the world, and this does in fact seem to be the case, as other third-party offerings only appear to make use of one of the cameras.

4_

In terms of lens options, the Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit product announcement revealed two dual-lens setups designed by Ztylus Innovations – a Macro Zoom that allows you to focus very close to your subject for striking detail, and a Fisheye/Telephoto that expands the optical zoom capabilities of the dual cameras on the iPhone 7 Plus.

3_

Sure, you might not have such a huge selection of optics as with the OlloClip system, and the lenses may not have the ZEISS logo like on ExoLens Pro. But the low-profile that the Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit offers, as well as the ease of use that allows you to change optical characteristics with a quick flick of your fingertips could make this product a favourite among iPhone filmmakers. If the price is competitive and the image quality stands up to the rigorous eye of filmmakers out there, this could turn out to be a very interesting product indeed. In the meantime, check out the sample footage below!

There is no pricing or availability for the Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit yet, but we’ve reached out to them and will keep you posted.

Would you pimp your iPhone 7 Plus with something like this? Have you tried any of the alternatives? Let us know in the comments below!

The post The Kamerar ZOOM Lens Kit – a Removable Dual-Lens System for the iPhone 7 Plus appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DFabian Chaundy

Since 1920, the prestigious American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) credentials have appeared in film titles alongside some of the most celebrated cinematographers in history. The American Society of Cinematographers has announced their the ASC Award TV nominees and HBO leads the group with five nominations. Read the full nominee list and more below: 

Picture: HBO

Picture: HBO

For the full list of ASC Award TV nominees jump to the bottom of the page.

HBO has led the TV awards season field for several years now and if the ASC awards are any indication, that isn’t likely to end soon. Game of Thrones, Westworld, All The Way and The Night Of  each landed nominations for HBO, with Game of Thrones receiving two nominations in the Non-Commercial category. Each of the 15 nominees were selected by ASC members.

Irish cinematographer John Conroy receives his first nomination for his work on Showtime’s gorgeous looking Penny Dreadful. Below is the trailer for his nominated episode: “The Day Tennyson Died”.

Anette Haellmigk, the only female nominee, is nominated for her work on the episode “Book of the Stranger”, also for Game of Thrones. This is her third nomination for Game of Thrones (2014, 2015). Her first nomination came for Season 4’s epic finale: “The Children“. Trailer for “Book of the Stranger” below:

Christopher Norr has been nominated for his third consecutive time for his work on Fox’s Gotham.  This time for the episode: “Wrath of the Villains: Mr. Freeze”. The show has been touch and go with audiences and critics alike, but none of that changes the fact that Gotham looks great. Here is a quick promo for this years nominated episode:

Full List of Nominees: 

Regular Series for Non-Commercial Television

  • John Conroy for Penny Dreadful, “The Day Tennyson Died” (SHOWTIME)
  • David Dunlap for House of Cards, “Chapter 45” (NETFLIX)
  • Anette Haellmigk for Game of Thrones, “Book of the Stranger” (HBO)
  • Neville Kidd for Outlander, “Prestonpans” (STARZ)
  • Fabian Wagner, BSC for Game of Thrones, “Battle of the Bastards” (HBO)

 Regular Series for Commercial Television

  • Tod Campbell for Mr. Robot (USA)
  • John Grillo for Preacher, “Finish the Song” (AMC)
  • Kevin McKnight for Underground, “The Macon 7” (WGN)
  • Christopher Norr for Gotham, “Wrath of the Villains: Mr. Freeze” (FOX)
  • Richard Rutkowski for Manhattan, “Jupiter” (WGN)

 Movie, Miniseries, or Pilot for Television

  • Balazs Bolygo, HSC, BSC for Harley and the Davidsons, “Amazing Machine” (DISCOVERY)
  • Paul Cameron, ASC for Westworld, “The Original” (HBO)
  • Jim Denault, ASC for All The Way (HBO)
  • Alex Disenhof for The Exorcist, “Chapter One: And Let My Cry Come Unto Thee” (FOX)
  • Igor Martinovic for The Night Of, “Subtle Beast” (HBO)
Picture: John P. Johnson/HBO

Picture: John P. Johnson/HBO

Since 2000, the “golden age of TV” has been marked by improved cinematography and storytelling and the above cinematographers are helping to further blur the line between film and television production value.

Winners will be announced on February 4, 2017.

 

The post ASC Award TV Nominees Announced – Five Nominations for HBO appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DGraham Sheldon

So you're all pumped up and ready to start making awesome portraits. You've got your camera, a great portrait lens, you've even scouted a location. Now all you need is someone to photograph.

In today's quick tip, we look at four different ways to find yourself a photography model. From encouraging friends and family to take part, through to advertising and using the Internet to find a model. I'd also love to hear your tips on the subject!

1. Friends and Family

The most obvious place to start is with close family and friends. They’ll likely be more forgiving and patient with you, and you won’t need to work on building up a rapport with the model. It’s also the least expensive route—both in terms of time and money.

The downside is that you’ve probably already photographed these people several times before. The experience won’t push you out of your comfort zone—if the resulting photos aren’t all that good, you haven’t lost anything.

Image of two siblings lying in bed together Photo by Pixabay
Image of two siblings lying in bed together. Photo by Pixabay

You can make the process easier by picking friends with certain characteristics. Find someone who loves to be the centre of attention, and is confident with their appearance. They need to be comfortable with you and, ideall, also have a motive for wanting to have their photo taken (e.g. head shots, or portraits for their CV).

Image of two friends hanging out lying on the ground Photo by Gianne Karla Tolentino
Image of two friends hanging out lying on the ground. Photo by Gianne Karla Tolentino

Working with friends and family makes an excellent starting point, but it’s important to move on from this stage as soon as you start to feel confident.

2. The Internet

The Internet has a surprising abundance of people looking to have their photo taken. Websites such as Craigslist have a few potential models in sections such as "creative" and "talent". There are also lots of people advertising their photography services here—usually for a price. If you're happy to take portraits for free at first, you may well gather some interest.

A number of other websites such as ModelMayhem and OneModelPlace might be worth a shot, though it could take a while to find someone local and appropriate.

Image of ModelMayhems webpage
Image of ModelMayhem's webpage
As ever, it's advisable to be careful when using the Internet to find people to meet up with and photograph. Both parties are likely to be wary, and it might be a good idea to first meet someone casually before arranging a formal photo shoot.

3. Advertise (With Freebies)

Rather than go looking for models, why not let them come to you? Granted, this might not work wonderfully at first, but as you start to become more proficient, word spreads. Add a notice to your website letting readers know that you're looking for models, and offer them an incentive. This could be a free CD of the shoot, prints, or even a photo book: something to make it worth their while.

Image of Elena Elisseevas webpage
Image of Elena Elisseeva's webpage. 

Many photographers do this to enhance their stock portfolio. Check out Elena Elisseeva's page for an example.

4. Agencies

Once money exchanges hands and you hire a professional, expectations of your skill and professionalism are bound to rise. You'll also feel slightly more pressure to perform well, as you've spent hard-earned money on your model's time. It's also important to weigh up whether it's worthwhile financially. If you're planning to sell the images, use them in your portfolio, or generally need the experience, it may well be easy to justify the price.

Share Your Experience

I'm sure some of our readers have encountered this situation before. Which route have you found to work well, and at what stage should photographers be looking to progress to the next stage of portrait photography?

Once you've made some successful portraits, why not try selling them on PhotoDune? The world of stock photography always needs a more diverse representation of faces.



All credit is given to author Envato Tuts+ Photo & VideoDavid Appleyard

So you're all pumped up and ready to start making awesome portraits. You've got your camera, a great portrait lens, you've even scouted a location. Now all you need is someone to photograph.

In today's quick tip, we look at four different ways to find yourself a photography model. From encouraging friends and family to take part, through to advertising and using the Internet to find a model. I'd also love to hear your tips on the subject!

1. Friends and Family

The most obvious place to start is with close family and friends. They’ll likely be more forgiving and patient with you, and you won’t need to work on building up a rapport with the model. It’s also the least expensive route—both in terms of time and money.

The downside is that you’ve probably already photographed these people several times before. The experience won’t push you out of your comfort zone—if the resulting photos aren’t all that good, you haven’t lost anything.

Image of two siblings lying in bed together Photo by Pixabay
Image of two siblings lying in bed together. Photo by Pixabay

You can make the process easier by picking friends with certain characteristics. Find someone who loves to be the centre of attention, and is confident with their appearance. They need to be comfortable with you and, ideall, also have a motive for wanting to have their photo taken (e.g. head shots, or portraits for their CV).

Image of two friends hanging out lying on the ground Photo by Gianne Karla Tolentino
Image of two friends hanging out lying on the ground. Photo by Gianne Karla Tolentino

Working with friends and family makes an excellent starting point, but it’s important to move on from this stage as soon as you start to feel confident.

2. The Internet

The Internet has a surprising abundance of people looking to have their photo taken. Websites such as Craigslist have a few potential models in sections such as "creative" and "talent". There are also lots of people advertising their photography services here—usually for a price. If you're happy to take portraits for free at first, you may well gather some interest.

A number of other websites such as ModelMayhem and OneModelPlace might be worth a shot, though it could take a while to find someone local and appropriate.

Image of ModelMayhems webpage
Image of ModelMayhem's webpage
As ever, it's advisable to be careful when using the Internet to find people to meet up with and photograph. Both parties are likely to be wary, and it might be a good idea to first meet someone casually before arranging a formal photo shoot.

3. Advertise (With Freebies)

Rather than go looking for models, why not let them come to you? Granted, this might not work wonderfully at first, but as you start to become more proficient, word spreads. Add a notice to your website letting readers know that you're looking for models, and offer them an incentive. This could be a free CD of the shoot, prints, or even a photo book: something to make it worth their while.

Image of Elena Elisseevas webpage
Image of Elena Elisseeva's webpage. 

Many photographers do this to enhance their stock portfolio. Check out Elena Elisseeva's page for an example.

4. Agencies

Once money exchanges hands and you hire a professional, expectations of your skill and professionalism are bound to rise. You'll also feel slightly more pressure to perform well, as you've spent hard-earned money on your model's time. It's also important to weigh up whether it's worthwhile financially. If you're planning to sell the images, use them in your portfolio, or generally need the experience, it may well be easy to justify the price.

Share Your Experience

I'm sure some of our readers have encountered this situation before. Which route have you found to work well, and at what stage should photographers be looking to progress to the next stage of portrait photography?

Once you've made some successful portraits, why not try selling them on PhotoDune? The world of stock photography always needs a more diverse representation of faces.



All credit is given to author Envato Tuts+ Photo & VideoDavid Appleyard

What is your typical Multi-camera Setup when recording a performance, recital, concert, etc? Well here's a quick look at my most basic gear for three static camera angles. I typically go with (3) Panasonic GH4 cameras as I love the super long battery life, and 4K video recording all day (deliver 1080 but flexible in post for faux zooms and crops).

cheesycam-core-multi-camera-angle-shoot-gear

If i'm doing a 3 camera angle shoot, I find it's easier to match footage when you have the exact same cameras (same color profile, set same exposure, etc).

I also make sure to add a good microphone to each camera as you need really good scratch audio to do a quick sync in post. As a backup I also run timecode on all cameras and match them as close possible for post sync. In the photo you'll see i'll use either a Rode VideoMic Pro or Azden SMX-30.

I also try to use Sandisk 128GB SDXC Cards so I don't have to swap cards during the event, and record each video clip as long as possible. I find it's easier to sync a few long clips in post than a hundred small clips. Once the clips are synced in post, it's easy to cut out all the dead time.

For audio, I make sure to bring a few portable audio recorders (like Zoom H1) and set them up close to Audio Speakers, but i'll bring a Multitrack recorder (like Zoom H6) to plug directly into the sound board. The Zoom H6 offers dual recording in case sound peaks, and worst case scenario I can sometimes grab audio from the cameras (since they are mic'd up).

I also break out my hands free wireless headsets for each camera operator to make sure everyone is on the same page. Good communication is key between multiple operators.

Finally and totally optional, i've rigged up a dual monitor setup with Camera Motion Research Connex Wireless Video Kits. Super reliable and long range systems. So while i'm operating the main camera, I can get a feed from the two other camera angles and make sure I have a clear visual what everyone is covering. With our wireless headsets, I can direct the other two operators to make sure we cover the entire performance.

So that's a quick look at the core parts of how I tackle these quick Multi-camera angle shoots. Do you have any favorite pieces of gear of tips you'd like to share?

All credit is given to author CheesyCamCheesycam

This comprehensive Filmic Pro tutorial will guide you through getting the best results possible with the Filmic Pro camera app. I hope it helps put you on the right track to creating great looking content with your phone.

In a previous article 10 Tips To Shoot Cinematic Smartphone Video I went into detail describing the most important aspects to achieving the best video possible from your smartphone. In the following video tutorial I take you through the actual Filmic Pro app and explain the best settings to use step by step.

I’ve been shooting with my iPhone SE since July and have pretty much figured out how to get the best out of it. The whole thing started for me out of curiosity more than anything else, but it got serious when I discovered what is possible from a phone in the right conditions. Of course capturing video is only the beginning, how to best deal with it in post, and in color correction and grading specifically is what can give it a real big-camera impact.

Color correction and grading tips specifically for smartphone originated video will be next, so stay tuned for more.

The post Smartphone Video Essentials – Filmic Pro Tutorial appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author News – cinema5DRichard Lackey