Category: FS100

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Note: This is an early-days test I did quickly before a shoot today. A larger one encompassing more cameras (GH3, D5200, 5D Mark III, Blackmagic Pocket Camera) and scenes will be on EOSHD during the coming week.

The Sony RX10 appears to play in the same ballpark as the Sony FS100. Is this the new budget king for semi-pro videographers?

Here I’ve graded a few shots of my EOSHD test scene using Film Convert.

First impression is that the Sony A7R really benefits from some post work and the Vivid picture profile looks best when used with Film Converts film emulsion emulation. You can set the A7R to Neutral and do a flat image, turn sharpness all the way down, but to be honest – what for? It doesn’t give me nicer results, somehow the desaturation is baked into the file. So vivid with sharpness on default seems to be the way to go. Unfortunately, you do get some stair stepping and jaggedness no matter what the sharpness setting is on, because of the line-skipping sensor output.

Sony Shootout

With this test scene the A7R looks nice. On a wide angle exterior shot set to infinity I think the gap between the A7R and RX10 would seem a lot larger.

The RX10 is really impressing me. Considering the sensor is stuffed full of megapixels (20MP) it has a very clean image. Obviously that full pixel readout is really helping.

I’ve tested the uncompressed HDMI output and really the AVCHD stands up pretty well to it. With DSLRs what matters is how much data the sensor outputs in video mode and how well the internal processor debayers the raw output before it gets sent to the HDMI port or the AVCHD encoder chip. In the end that AVCHD compression doesn’t noticeably degrade the image. It does smudge out some grain but the grain is never fine to begin with especially on the A7R. Would a better codec be worth it on the RX10? Only if it was a significant step up to 10bit ProRes 422 like on the Blackmagic Cinema Camera.

The RX10 handles beautifully. The lens just feels fantastic. Never used such a nice aperture ring before on a fixed lens camera. In stepless mode it’s smooth and ultra precice.

With active image stabilisation turned on you get a bit of a crop. With it set only to optical image stabilisation without the added electronic crop for extra stability, there’s no crop. It’s great to have two stabilisation options in the camera. With active stabilisation enabled it is approaching Olympus 5 axis IBIS for effectiveness.

That and the built in ND filter are both missing from the A7R.

I put the RX1 (full frame compact) in the test as well. This is a muddy as hell camera for video but it should give you an idea of what the A7 looks like, as it shares the same sensor.

For me the A7 is more in the ballpark of the A99 and the A7R is more like the Nikon D800.

Notes on grading

All shots FJ 8534 VD in Film Convert unless ungraded.

Sharpness + 10 added. Grain at 0%.

Film Convert does not yet have a dedicated A7R or RX10 camera profile but I found the 5D Mark III Standard profile worked well.

The shot is ISO 400 at 1/50 in 1080/25p mode.

1080/50p on the RX10 and A7R looks identical with no loss of detail, but on some shots you will notice more compression.

Enjoy your pixel peeping!

The post Sample video – comparing the Sony RX10, A7R and FS100 appeared first on EOSHD.com.

All credit is given to author EOSHD.comAndrew Reid

Atomos Connect H2S

Early this year, Atomos released the Connect SDI/HDMI convertor. It’s a portable convertor that comes in two flavours – the Connect H2S (converts HDMI to SDI) and the Connect S2H (converts SDI to HDMI). It’s a fantastic little device, and has been somewhat overlooked since its release earlier in the summer.

Now, there are a few products out there that perform the conversion task, but the majority are not portable. Despite being small devices, most require AC power. This immediately bumps the Atomos Connect towards the top of the list for fieldwork. But Atomos didn’t simply just add a battery; this is a well-designed bit of kit that’s made to fit seamlessly into any professional workflow that requires this conversion.

Atomos Connect H2S

Let’s first look at the power options for this convertor:

It runs off the popular Sony L series batteries. It’ll run off the Sony NP-F570 (one of the smallest in the line-up) for just under 10 hours. Use it with the NP-F970 and you’re in the 20-30 hour region. It ships with an unbranded NP-F570 equivalent.

It also has an in-built 1 hour battery, so when you run out of juice with your exterior source you won’t lose signal (the device has an LED indicator for when it changes battery source).

It also comes with an AC adaptor. So when you are around mains power, you can simply plug it in. However due to how long it lasts off battery it will be sometimes easier to not bother with the additional cable. It will connect via D-tap also with additional adaptor.

The final point in regards to power (which is a feature I love) is its loop through continuous power. the underside of the Atomos Connect is designed just like a battery:

Atomos Connect H2S

This means you can mount it to the back of an Atomos recorder (Ninja, Samurai, Samurai Blade) light, monitor or anything that takes Sony L series batteries, and the battery will power both the convertor and the device it’s connected to.

Atomos Connect attached to recorder

Both Atomos Connect convertors offer one HDMI port and 2 BNC ports offering 3G/HD/SD-SDI. With the H2S the HDMI is an input, and the SDIs are output. The S2H is vice versa. Both also have a USB port for firmware updates.

Touching on a few of the Atomos Connect key features:

  • It can transmit a Test Pattern Generator and Audio Tone Generator for sync with other devices.
  • It features real-time 3:2 pulldown removal, to extract 24/30p from 60i & 25p from 50i or PSF equivalents.
  • It has timecode pass-through that works both ways (so works for both H2S and S2H). This includes start/stop protocols when using an Atomos recorder, and timecode flags.
  • And lastly it utilizes all of it’s LED indicators to make a pretty decent torch – Bit of a quirky feature but I’m sure can have some use on set when fishing around in the dark for cables.

For me, one of the greatest features this device has over other convertors is going back to it’s battery mount design, and how well this can be utilized in conjunction with the Sony FS100.

The FS100 lacks SDI, it’s one of the key features that superior FS700 has over it’s smaller brother. With the Atomos Connect H2S you can offer this output via the HDMI, and with the battery mount design you can offer this up as an almost on-camera output. Here’s how:

Buy a generic Sony L series charger. All these chargers come with a removable sledge (to keep the charger element universal).

Sony L series battery charger

The FS100 on the dumb side has a removable plastic blank, which is reserved for the expensive proprietary FMU recorder pack (SD cards are fine for this camera). Screw the charger sledge directly to the plastic blank (I had to sand down the sledge slightly in order for it to fit on the Atomos Connect).

Sony L series battery charger sledge

Simply Attach the Atomos Connect to the sledge, and attach the whole unit back on the camera

Atomos Connect H2S with FS100

This produces a fantastic compact mounting solution for the device. What’s more when you’re not using the Atomos Connect, simply remove it and you can rest a spare battery in its place for the camera (the FS100 takes the same Sony L series batteries).

Atomos Connect H2S with FS100

 

Atomos Connect H2S with FS100

Atomos Connect H2S with FS100

The Atomos Connect H2S, and Connect S2H are available from B&H for $295, which when compared with other professional convertors are very well priced. Not only is the H2S the perfect accessory for the FS100, but would go nicely with a Canon C100, 5D mark iii or Nikon D800. With a simply battery sledge to hot shot mount, you could mount it to these devices just as gracefully.

What’s more, it enables you to use the Samurai Blade with any of the mentioned cameras; offering you monitoring, recording and converting capabilities from two devices that bolt seamlessly together and power from just one battery.

All credit is given to author cinema5DTim Fok

In case you missed it, Zacuto released a part 3 of their Great Camera Shootout 2012. If you haven’t seen the first two parts it’s really worth checking them out.
Part 1: LINK
Part 2: LINK


If you’re serious about being a cinematographer you shouldn’t miss this series. It’s free to watch on Zacuto’s page. They just released the third and final part, continuing an in-depth comparison between today’s most important tools for digital cinematography ranging from the Sony F65 down to the iPhone 4S.

Just like last year a professional team of cinematographers compared the cameras in a controlled studio environment, later presented the results to filmmakers in the form of a digital cinema projection and eventually made a documentary about the whole thing which gives you a great scope of opinions and thoughts on the matter.
This year they added some life to the test by allowing the shooting teams to alter the light setup to perfectly fit each camera’s needs which I think is a very cool approach to show what each camera is really capable of. Because as we know each camera’s strength also depends on what people make out of it.

Cameras used: Arri Alexa, Canon C300, Canon 7D, Panasonic GH2, Sony F3, Sony F65, iPhone 4S, RED Epic

All credit is given to author cinema5D newsSebastian

Have you seen PART 1 of Zacuto’s Camera Shootout 2012? If you haven’t go here. If you have, you’re probably eager to find out which camera was which in their scientific and philosophic comparison between the most important up to date small and big digital film cameras.

If you’re serious about being a cinematographer you shouldn’t miss this series. It’s free to watch on Zacuto’s page. They just released the second part, continuing an in-depth look at today’s most important tools for cinematography ranging from the Sony F65 down to the iPhone 4S.

Just like last year a professional team of cinematographers compared the cameras in a controlled studio environment, later presented the results to filmmakers in the form of a digital cinema projection and eventually made a documentary about the whole thing which gives you a great scope of opinions and thoughts on the matter.
This year they added some life to the test by allowing the shooting teams to alter the light setup to perfectly fit each camera’s needs which I think is a very cool approach to show what each camera is really capable of. Because as we know each camera’s strength also depends on what people make out of it.

Here’s part 2: LINK

Cameras used: Arri Alexa, Canon C300, Canon 7D, Panasonic GH2, Sony F3, Sony F65, iPhone 4S, RED Epic

All credit is given to author cinema5D newsSebastian

Works for all AVCHD media.

Make sure to download the AVCHD plugin from Avid’s website. It’s required for this workflow: http://www.avid.com/US/products/Avid-Media-Access/plug-ins

I’m using Symphony 6 here but the workflow is identical in Media Composer. We start with AMA native AVCHD playback, then cut offline DNxHD36 files and relink to the originals, and then wrap up with encoding for the web using Sorenson Squeeze 8.5 and x264. The complete workflow through web delivery. Depending on your hardware capabilities you can choose to cut the AVCHD files natively or transcode to an offline option to optimize performance. TRT10minutes.

Follow me on twitter for more: @awalker47

Footage from Leica lens/filtration tests I ran with Chris Marino.

For those of you wondering what the difference is, Symphony is exactly the same as Media Composer save for some mastering options and a much more comprehensive color correction mode. Color grading is definitely much speedier in Symphony. For more info I suggest you watch this video from Dylan Reeve.

All credit is given to author Wide Open CameraAlex Walker

We’ve seen some reviews about the new Sony FS700 lately, but this camera is too important to be taken lightly. Let’s see what we can add to that pool.

Visit the Sony NEX-FS700 subforum:

All credit is given to author cinema5D newsSebastian


Good for us: Matt from dslrnewsshooter had the chance to work with a production version of the new Sony FS700 for several weeks and we can enjoy some good professional comments on the device.

In this review he points out the most relevant pro’s and con’s of the camera. Together with other reviews this one gives a pretty good picture of what you can expect from the much anticipated FS700. So if you’ve been interested or have already pre-ordered and want to get some more insights then you should really check out this very good 20-minute overview.

There’s nothing else to add from my part. I enjoyed Matt’s take and I’m looking forward to do some more testing on the camera myself soon.

If you haven’t pre-ordered you can do it here (camera is expected in mid July):

US:
The Sony FS-700 can be pre-ordered for $7999 at B&H

EU:
Europeans can get a 5% discount at the German reseller A.F. Marcotec with cinema5D’s discount code: LINK

via DSLR news shooter

All credit is given to author cinema5D newsSebastian

Zacuto presents its much anticipated Camera Shootout 2012. A both scientific and philosophic comparison between the most important up to date small and big digital film cameras.

If you’re serious about being a cinematographer you shouldn’t miss this series. It’s free to watch on Zacuto’s page.

Here’s part 1: LINK

Excerpt from the site:
We’ve got a lot to prove in Revenge of the Great Camera Shootout 2012. Some of it will surprise you, some of it will shock you, and some of it will change the way you work forever. Let’s make this clear: This is not the shootout you’re expecting.

Watch last year’s shootout series here.

Cameras used: Arri Alexa, Canon C300, Canon 7D, Panasonic GH2, Sony F3, Sony F65, iPhone 4S, RED Epic

So what letter was your favorite camera?
Have you written down your rankings?

All credit is given to author cinema5D newsSebastian

The Sony FS700, the first affordable slow motion camera is on its way (expected July 2012) and here we see what the pro’s are currently up to in this field.
Philip Johnston just shared a clip on how professional slow motion is done today in the Slomo FX factory at “The Marmalde” in Hamburg, Germany.

They’re using a motion controlled, extremely fast and precise robot-arm to create never seen movements during slow motion. It’s like Matrix, but with just 1 camera, and the camera is the unaffordable phantom.

via hdwarrior

All credit is given to author cinema5D newsSebastian

We’ve got another nice deal for our European readers: Just like the Blackmagic Cinema Camera deal (which is only valid until today by the way!), you can save some cash by using the discount code below.

Our #1 trusted European reseller A. F. Marcotec gives us an exclusive 5% discount for Sony’s new NEX-FS700 camera.

A. F. Marcotec sells professional filmmaking equipment in Europe and has some of the most competitive prices on the market.

They have the Sony FS700 listed for 8065,82€ (incl. VAT) (CVP sells it for 7948€) and the cinema5D discount code will give you -403,29€ off:

Excluding tax & shipping it will be 6439€ (=$8010).

Discount CODE: 31122012C5DFS700
SHOP link: Sony NEX-FS700E

Enter the code at checkout. The camera will start shipping in July.

American cinema5D readers can pre-order the camera for $7999 at B&H.

All credit is given to author cinema5D newsSebastian