Tagged: Review

Saramonic SR-AX107 (1 of 7)

The Saramonic SR-AX107 just showed up today. Build is solid and the finish is on par with what you get from Juicedlink and beachtek. The red faceplate on the Saramonic will do little to improve audio quality, but it’s starting to grow on me. 

Saramonic SR-AX107 (4 of 7)

Setting next to a Beachtek DXA-SLR, you can see that it’s a little on the chunky side. The Saramonic SR-AX107 is about a half inch taller and an inch and a half wider than the DXA-SLR but doesn’t stick out as far forward. On the other hand it’s about half the size of the Tascam DR-60d.

Saramonic SR-AX107 (7 of 7)

It might be a little easier to visualize the size of the Saramonic SR-AX107 by attaching it to a Canon 6d. I’d say it’s ruffly the size of a battery grip. The best use for the Saramonic SR-AX107 will most likely be mounted to a rig or on a tripod which is the case with most of these camera mount audio adapters.

Saramonic SR-AX107 (6 of 7)

I haven’t had a chance to play around with the audio yet, but I did manage to pop a battery in and power things up. The screen in backlit and the on board level meters look pretty nice. A few of the switches like  S/M (Stereo/Mono) and AGC disable, have on screen displays and there is also a battery indicator.

I should have some audio samples of the Saramonic SR-AX107 up towards the end of the week. So far, it looks like a nice design and it should be interesting to see how this guy sounds.

 

The post Saramonic SR-AX107 – First Impressions appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Saramonic SR-AX107 (1 of 7)

The Saramonic SR-AX107 just showed up today. Build is solid and the finish is on par with what you get from Juicedlink and beachtek. The red faceplate on the Saramonic will do little to improve audio quality, but it’s starting to grow on me. 

Saramonic SR-AX107 (4 of 7)

Setting next to a Beachtek DXA-SLR, you can see that it’s a little on the chunky side. The Saramonic SR-AX107 is about a half inch taller and an inch and a half wider than the DXA-SLR but doesn’t stick out as far forward. On the other hand it’s about half the size of the Tascam DR-60d.

Saramonic SR-AX107 (7 of 7)

It might be a little easier to visualize the size of the Saramonic SR-AX107 by attaching it to a Canon 6d. I’d say it’s ruffly the size of a battery grip. The best use for the Saramonic SR-AX107 will most likely be mounted to a rig or on a tripod which is the case with most of these camera mount audio adapters.

Saramonic SR-AX107 (6 of 7)

I haven’t had a chance to play around with the audio yet, but I did manage to pop a battery in and power things up. The screen in backlit and the on board level meters look pretty nice. A few of the switches like  S/M (Stereo/Mono) and AGC disable, have on screen displays and there is also a battery indicator.

I should have some audio samples of the Saramonic SR-AX107 up towards the end of the week. So far, it looks like a nice design and it should be interesting to see how this guy sounds.

 

The post Saramonic SR-AX107 – First Impressions appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Startech Docking station (1 of 3)

I’ve been using the MSI GS60 for the last 4 or 5 months as a high powered editing laptop. Lately I’ve been wondering if it could end up being a desktop replacement, so I started searching for some kind of docking station. After a bit of research I came across the Startech Universal 4k docking station.

Startech Docking station (2 of 3)

The docking station has a lot of extra ports and manages to provide 4k video via a single USB 3.0 port connected to the MSI GS60. There aren’t a lot of other docking station options to choose from so I thought I’d give this one a try.

One of the disappointing things about the docking station is that it’s limited to 30 hz in 4k mode. While this docking station does allow for a 4k output via the displayport output, it isn’t something you’ll probably want to game with. The Startech Universal 4k docking station is probably fine for productivity applications like video editing and spreadsheet work but gaming is likely off the table.

Startech Docking station (3 of 3)

Over all, the Startech Universal 4k docking station isn’t a bad buy, but i’m a little disappointed in the 4k refresh rates. I’m already limited by the 48hz screen on the MSI GS60, I think I’ll end up using the displayport output with my Samsung 4k panel and using the docking station for it’s assortment of usb ports.

The post StarTech Universal USB 3.0 4K Laptop Docking Station Review appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Smallrig EVF arm (1 of 2)

I’ve been testing out the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount arm a little more this week and I ran into a bit of a problem. The setup above (MustHD 5.6 inch panel on the Smallrig EVF mount) seems to be a dangerous combination. I’ll admit that the MustHD is one of the heaviest monitors in this form factor with it’s dual battery mount, and thick plastic body, but it was surprising to me that it had enough weight to defeat the holding power of the Smallrig EVF mount.

Smallrig EVF arm (2 of 2)

Thinking it was simply a matter of tightness, I decided to snug the tensioning thumbscrew all the way down. Turns out that doesn’t actually fix anything. In fact, after looking over the design, it’s probably a bad idea. While the normal urge is to tighten things down as tight as you can with this sort of device, that’s not really a good idea with Smallrig’s design as you’ll see in a second.

Smallrig EVF fix (1 of 3)

Since the Smallrig EVF mount wasn’t really functioning correctly, i decided to take it apart. Basically what’s inside is a plastic spacer. In the right position it’ll snug up the clamp against the rotating portion and lock it into place. However if it gets into the position above, it wont clamp down anything.

Smallrig EVF fix (2 of 3)

While I had the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount apart, I decided to take a closer look at the plastic spacer. It appears to be a cut off piece from a very large zip tie. If you look close, you can actually see the uneven cut marks on either side of this little “spacer”.

Smallrig EVF fix (3 of 3)

In order to fix the problem, I had to rotate the spacer on the Smallrig EVF mount to the position above. Once that was done the locking power of the clamp seems return.

While this is a pretty easy fix and probably not the end of the world, it’s still a problem worth noting. If the spacer were a bit longer, there wouldn’t be the opportunity for the spacer to slip into a position that disables the clamp. As is if the Smallrig EVF mount’s spacer ring slips into the wrong spot, the clamp will provide almost no holding power.

After making this change, I was able to get the MustHD 5.6 inch panel to stay in place. If you are having experiencing this problem with your adapter, you might want to give this a try. Hopefully Smallrig will address this problem in the future.

The post Smallrig EVF arm slips under pressure, here’s a quick fix appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Sony a7s Smallrig build (1 of 7)

I’ve been looking for a small mounting frame for the Sony a7s and a few of you recommended I check out Smallrig’s offering. Smallrig sells a lot of bits and pieces so it can be a little confusing when you are trying to figure out what parts you need/want for a rig. It took me a little time trying to visualize the layout I was looking for on the Sony a7s and this is what I came up with:

Sony a7s Smallrig build (2 of 7)

The handle I selected has a vertical Nato clamp instead of a horizontal Nato clamp and includes a cold shoe adapter. Most of Smallrig’s handles have horizontal Nato clamps. I’m guessing this is because they were intended to slide across the top of the camera in order to balance things out, but I wanted to use the handle in a slightly different manner.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (3 of 7)
I was also looking for a compact monitor mounting option and the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount seemed like a decent solution. While it is intended for an EVF, it’s also perfect for a small 5 inch monitor.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (4 of 7)

For those of you not familiar with Nato rails, they’re simply a plate with ridges on either side that allow you to clamp on extra gear. These rails were originally developed as a method for gun mounting flashlights and scopes, but companies like Smallrig and Wooden Camera have started to use them on camera rigs.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (6 of 7)

I used the Nato rails on the top and side of the sony cage. In one configuration I can hold the Sony a7s hand grip in my right hand and the handle in my left hand for an easy two handed minimalist rig.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (7 of 7)

Slide the handle off the side and move it to the top of the unit, then slide on the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount and you have a nice setup for a slider or tripod. Strip the handle and EVF mount off and you are basically back to the form factor of the Sony a7s with a few extra mounting options.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (5 of 7)

Overall i’m pretty impressed with Smallrig’s system. All the parts and pieces set me back about $165 plus shipping which is a little pricy for a minimalist rig but far less than Wooden Camera’s small dslr cage system.

If I were to place this order again I think I would trade out the Nato rails I picked for the Smallrig 1409 rail or Smallrig quick release Nato rail. While the 1437 Smallrig Nato rail I choose works well on the side of the unit, I was only really able to get two of the three screws in on the top of the unit. I don’t think it’s a problem, but if you are looking to duplicate my setup, those two options are worth looking into.

I’ll post a review video on this when I get some more time this weekend. It’s not quite perfect yet, but i’m still pretty happy with how it turned out.

The post Smallrig Sony a7s custom camera cage appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Sony a7s Smallrig build (1 of 7)

I’ve been looking for a small mounting frame for the Sony a7s and a few of you recommended I check out Smallrig’s offering. Smallrig sells a lot of bits and pieces so it can be a little confusing when you are trying to figure out what parts you need/want for a rig. It took me a little time trying to visualize the layout I was looking for on the Sony a7s and this is what I came up with:

Sony a7s Smallrig build (2 of 7)

The handle I selected has a vertical Nato clamp instead of a horizontal Nato clamp and includes a cold shoe adapter. Most of Smallrig’s handles have horizontal Nato clamps. I’m guessing this is because they were intended to slide across the top of the camera in order to balance things out, but I wanted to use the handle in a slightly different manner.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (3 of 7)
I was also looking for a compact monitor mounting option and the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount seemed like a decent solution. While it is intended for an EVF, it’s also perfect for a small 5 inch monitor.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (4 of 7)

For those of you not familiar with Nato rails, they’re simply a plate with ridges on either side that allow you to clamp on extra gear. These rails were originally developed as a method for gun mounting flashlights and scopes, but companies like Smallrig and Wooden Camera have started to use them on camera rigs.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (6 of 7)

I used the Nato rails on the top and side of the sony cage. In one configuration I can hold the Sony a7s hand grip in my right hand and the handle in my left hand for an easy two handed minimalist rig.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (7 of 7)

Slide the handle off the side and move it to the top of the unit, then slide on the Smallrig 1422 EVF Nato mount and you have a nice setup for a slider or tripod. Strip the handle and EVF mount off and you are basically back to the form factor of the Sony a7s with a few extra mounting options.

Sony a7s Smallrig build (5 of 7)

Overall i’m pretty impressed with Smallrig’s system. All the parts and pieces set me back about $165 plus shipping which is a little pricy for a minimalist rig but far less than Wooden Camera’s small dslr cage system.

If I were to place this order again I think I would trade out the Nato rails I picked for the Smallrig 1409 rail or Smallrig quick release Nato rail. While the 1437 Smallrig Nato rail I choose works well on the side of the unit, I was only really able to get two of the three screws in on the top of the unit. I don’t think it’s a problem, but if you are looking to duplicate my setup, those two options are worth looking into.

I’ll post a review video on this when I get some more time this weekend. It’s not quite perfect yet, but i’m still pretty happy with how it turned out.

The post Smallrig Sony a7s custom camera cage appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

The Hedron is a new line of Cinevate camera sliders, available in four lengths from 2 to 5 foot. With a payload of 100lbs this is a heavyweight slider, I was sent the 3 foot version to check out and review.

Crafted from CNC aluminium and lighter than Cinevates Atlas 10 slider at respective lengths, the Hedron ships with all terrain adjustable legs and anti-scratch feet.

It’s compatible with Moco systems for motion control, and a counterweight for vertical slides, but the most exciting optional extra is the flywheel.

This is quite a unique feature of the Hedron, it attaches to the carriage via belt. The weight of the flywheel builds momentum as the carriage moves, providing a smoother and more consistent slide.

Pros

Strong, sturdy build with huge max payload

Flywheel produces very smooth slides

Fantastic bag and rail rubbers

Cons

Bounced with under heavy load when unsupported

Flywheel takes time to setup

Cinevate Hedron

I really enjoyed using the Cinevate Hedron, I can’t speak highly enough of the flywheel, it really does well in smoothing out human error. Cinevate market this as the one take wonder slider, and you can really see why. Just make sure you buy a bag that’s big enough to house the lot. Removing the flywheel after every shoot is cumbersome.

The size and weight was a little over board for my style of shooting, but this was good grounds for the review as it proved that this large heavyweight slider can be manoeuvred quickly and efficiently, and operable from one sturdy tripod.

Equipment used for review:

Sony A7S
Canon C100 mark I
Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 II L
Canon 100mm f/2.8 Macro L
Canon 24-105mm f/4 IS
Sachtler Cine DSLR Head (now discontinued, FSB 8 next best thing)
Miller Solo CF legs
Rode NTG 3

Music: The Music Bed, “Two by Analog Heart”

The post Cinevate Hedron Slider Review appeared first on cinema5D.

All credit is given to author cinema5D » NewsTim Fok

Aspen Lav vs JK lav (1 of 1)

On the left we have the JK MIC-J lav mic and on the right we have the Aspen lav mic. They both look very similar and from a distance it’s hard to tell them apart. The included foam filters are the same for both, as are the tie clips, but there are slight physical differences between the two. I’ll start with those before we get to the audio tests.

First, look at the capsules. You can see that the Aspen lav mic on the right has a slight pinch in the capsule before it tapers off and the mic is slightly longer than the JK MIC-J lav mic. The Aspen lav mic has a slightly thicker cable which makes sense, as it’s wired up a bit differently.

MIC-J (2 of 3)

The JK MIC-J lav mic comes with a Sennheiser style “screw in” sleeve adapter, while the Aspen lav mic comes with a plain jane 3.5mm connector. The cable that comes with the JK MIC-J lav mic is a bit longer, but feels slightly cheaper than the Aspen lav mic.

Most of these are minor differences, but the wiring is notable. The Aspen lav mic and JK MIC-J lav mic are both equipped with a stereo plug, but the Aspen lav is wired so that the audio is fed to both the tip and the ring (left and right channels), while the JK MIC-J lav mic only feeds audio to the tip (left channel).

This isn’t an issue when using a wireless system like the Sennheiser G3, but if does mean that if you are recording audio directly into a Zoom h1, the JK will only supply audio on a single channel, while the Aspen will provide audio to both channels. On the flip side, the Aspen lav has a slightly weaker signal than the JK MIC-J lav mic. I suspect that the slight difference in output level is due to the wiring difference.

Above is the recording from the Aspen lav mic fed directly into the Zoom h1.

And this is the JK MIC-J lav mic fed directly into the Zoom h1.

Aspen Mic monoprice wireless (1 of 5)

I’ve listened to these two mics numerous times and other than the slightly weaker output from the Aspen lav mic, they sound basically identical to my ear. The JK is $29 and the Aspen is $54, other than the tin case and wiring difference, these mic’s are pretty much the same.

So if you want the tin case and find the wiring difference beneficial, spend an extra $25 on the Aspen lav mic, otherwise you may as well by the cheaper JK MIC-J lav mic for $29. Take a listen to the audio samples above and let me know if you disagree/agree with my conclusion. My ears are a bit older so I could be missing something, but I doubt it.

The post Aspen Lav and JK MIC-J 044 lav are basically the same appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Transcend 128GB SDXC card speed test

Transcend 128GB card (1 of 1)

Right now the Transcend 128GB UHS-3 SDXC cards are down to $69. That makes them a pretty decent price for that capacity and claimed speed. The prominently displayed “ULTIMATE” logo on the package proclaims greatness and the “UHS-3″ label is supposed to guarantee a minimum continuous speed of 30MB/s. While Sandisk has taught me to distrust overly enthusiastic adjectives, I still felt the Transcend 128GB SDXC card was worth a look.

Sandisk Extreme Pro 95MBs

First let’s take a look at the competition. This is the test result in CrystalDiskmark from the Sandisk 32GB “extreme pro” SDHC card. At $39.95 a piece the extreme pro’s cost per about $1.25 a GB, which makes them substantially more expensive than Transcend’s 55 cents a GB pricing. For that price you end up with Sequential read speeds of 78MB/s and write speeds of 71MB/s. While it’s not the 90MB/s and 95MB/s that’s advertised, Sandisk does use the modifier “up to” in the description. Even though it’s a ways off from the mark, these read/write speeds are still very respectable.

Transcend 128GB Speed test 1GB writes

Looking at the Transcend 128GB UHS-3 SDXC cards, I was pleasantly surprised to see that the write speed hit 63MB/s. That’s actually higher than the advertised 60MB/s label and the 86MB/s read speed is closer to the advertised speed than the Sandisk card.

The Transcend 128GB UHS-3 SDXC cards might actually be the first card i’ve tested that surpased it’s write speed label. It doesn’t write as fast as the extreme pro, but it also doesn’t make the claim of 95MB/s writes.

I think I’ll be sliding this card into my regular rotation. If the Transcend 128GB SDXC card doesn’t fail or drop out after a few months, I might even buy a couple more. I’ve had pretty good luck with Transcend cards in the past, but I have heard a few horror stories from others. That might be why Transcend is now offering “lifetime warranties” and “free recovery software”. With these speeds, it might be time to give Transcend a second chance.

The post Transcend 128GB SDXC card speed test appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay

Transcend 128GB SDXC card speed test

Transcend 128GB card (1 of 1)

Right now the Transcend 128GB UHS-3 SDXC cards are down to $69. That makes them a pretty decent price for that capacity and claimed speed. The prominently displayed “ULTIMATE” logo on the package proclaims greatness and the “UHS-3″ label is supposed to guarantee a minimum continuous speed of 30MB/s. While Sandisk has taught me to distrust overly enthusiastic adjectives, I still felt the Transcend 128GB SDXC card was worth a look.

Sandisk Extreme Pro 95MBs

First let’s take a look at the competition. This is the test result in CrystalDiskmark from the Sandisk 32GB “extreme pro” SDHC card. At $39.95 a piece the extreme pro’s cost per about $1.25 a GB, which makes them substantially more expensive than Transcend’s 55 cents a GB pricing. For that price you end up with Sequential read speeds of 78MB/s and write speeds of 71MB/s. While it’s not the 90MB/s and 95MB/s that’s advertised, Sandisk does use the modifier “up to” in the description. Even though it’s a ways off from the mark, these read/write speeds are still very respectable.

Transcend 128GB Speed test 1GB writes

Looking at the Transcend 128GB UHS-3 SDXC cards, I was pleasantly surprised to see that the write speed hit 63MB/s. That’s actually higher than the advertised 60MB/s label and the 86MB/s read speed is closer to the advertised speed than the Sandisk card.

The Transcend 128GB UHS-3 SDXC cards might actually be the first card i’ve tested that surpased it’s write speed label. It doesn’t write as fast as the extreme pro, but it also doesn’t make the claim of 95MB/s writes.

I think I’ll be sliding this card into my regular rotation. If the Transcend 128GB SDXC card doesn’t fail or drop out after a few months, I might even buy a couple more. I’ve had pretty good luck with Transcend cards in the past, but I have heard a few horror stories from others. That might be why Transcend is now offering “lifetime warranties” and “free recovery software”. With these speeds, it might be time to give Transcend a second chance.

The post Transcend 128GB SDXC card speed test appeared first on DSLR Film Noob.

All credit is given to author DSLR Film NoobDeejay